Localization of near-infrared labeled antibodies to the central nervous system in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

Sang Lee, Hannah E. Salapa, Michael C. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Antibodies, including antibodies to the RNA binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, thus it is important to assess their biological activity using animal models of disease. Near-infrared optical imaging of fluorescently labeled antibodies and matrix metalloproteinase activity were measured and quantified in an animal model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We successfully labeled, imaged and quantified the fluorescence signal of antibodies that localized to the central nervous system of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Fluorescently labeled anti-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 antibodies persisted in the central nervous system of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, colocalized with matrix metalloproteinase activity, correlated with clinical disease and shifted rostrally within the spinal cord, consistent with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis being an ascending paralysis. The fluorescent antibody signal also colocalized with matrix metalloproteinase activity in brain. Previous imaging studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis analyzed inflammatory markers such as cellular immune responses, dendritic cell activity, blood brain barrier integrity and myelination, but none assessed fluorescently labeled antibodies within the central nervous system. This data suggests a strong association between autoantibody localization and disease. This system can be used to detect other antibodies that might contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system including multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0212357
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Autoimmune Experimental Encephalomyelitis
Neurology
encephalitis
central nervous system
Central Nervous System
Infrared radiation
antibodies
Antibodies
sclerosis
metalloproteinases
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins
Neurologic Mutant Mice
Multiple Sclerosis
ribonucleoproteins
Animals
pathogenesis
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System
animal disease models
image analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Localization of near-infrared labeled antibodies to the central nervous system in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. / Lee, Sang; Salapa, Hannah E.; Levin, Michael C.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 2, e0212357, 01.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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