Long-term assessment of a damp-stored, albumin-coated, knitted vascular graft

G. S. McGee, T. A. Shuman, J. B. Atkinson, F. A. Weaver, William Edwards

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In a previous study the authors reported greater endothelialization and thrombus-free surface area in albumin-coated grafts compared with collagen-coated grafts after 1 month's aortic interposition. Another study was undertaken to determine whether these differences persisted after a 6-month implantation period. A 6 cm segment of either an albumin-coated [n = 6] or a collagen-coated [n = 4] graft was implanted into a canine descending thoracic aorta for 6 months. Light micrographs from multiple sections of each explanted graft were scored from 1 to 4, least to most, for tissue ingrowth, perigraft inflammation, and capsular thickness. Using computer planimetry, luminal thrombus free surface area and endothelial coverage were calculated from gross and electron photomicrographs, respectively. The results were averaged and expressed as mean ± standard error (SEM). After 6 months, no significant differences were noted between the albumin-coated grafts and the collagen-coated grafts, both of which were durable and served equally well as scaffolds for vascular remodeling and tissue incorporation. The authors conclude that the safety, ease of handling, low porosity, low thrombogenicity, and durability of the albuminated grafts warrant their clinical trial.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)174-176
    Number of pages3
    JournalAmerican Surgeon
    Volume55
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

    Fingerprint

    Blood Vessels
    Albumins
    Transplants
    Collagen
    Thoracic Aorta
    Thrombosis
    Porosity
    Canidae
    Clinical Trials
    Electrons
    Inflammation
    Safety
    Light

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    McGee, G. S., Shuman, T. A., Atkinson, J. B., Weaver, F. A., & Edwards, W. (1989). Long-term assessment of a damp-stored, albumin-coated, knitted vascular graft. American Surgeon, 55(3), 174-176.

    Long-term assessment of a damp-stored, albumin-coated, knitted vascular graft. / McGee, G. S.; Shuman, T. A.; Atkinson, J. B.; Weaver, F. A.; Edwards, William.

    In: American Surgeon, Vol. 55, No. 3, 01.01.1989, p. 174-176.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    McGee, GS, Shuman, TA, Atkinson, JB, Weaver, FA & Edwards, W 1989, 'Long-term assessment of a damp-stored, albumin-coated, knitted vascular graft', American Surgeon, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 174-176.
    McGee GS, Shuman TA, Atkinson JB, Weaver FA, Edwards W. Long-term assessment of a damp-stored, albumin-coated, knitted vascular graft. American Surgeon. 1989 Jan 1;55(3):174-176.
    McGee, G. S. ; Shuman, T. A. ; Atkinson, J. B. ; Weaver, F. A. ; Edwards, William. / Long-term assessment of a damp-stored, albumin-coated, knitted vascular graft. In: American Surgeon. 1989 ; Vol. 55, No. 3. pp. 174-176.
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