Long-term Impact of Weight Loss Intervention on Changes in Cognitive Function

Exploratory Analyses from the Action for Health in Diabetes Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

for the Action for Health In Diabetes Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Look AHEAD Brain) and Action for Health Movement and Memory Ancillary Study Research Groups

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Diabetes adversely impacts cognition. Lifestyle change can improve diabetes control and potentially improve cognition. We examined whether weight loss through reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity was associated with slower cognitive aging in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods The Look AHEAD randomized controlled clinical trial delivered 10 years of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) that yielded long-term weight losses. During 5 years spanning the end of intervention and postintervention follow-up, repeated cognitive assessments were obtained in 1,091 individuals who had been assigned to ILI or a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE). We compared the means and slopes of scores on cognitive testing over these repeated assessments. Results Compared with DSE, assignment to ILI was associated with a -0.082 SD deficit in mean global cognitive function across repeated assessments (p =.010). However, overweight (body mass index [BMI] < 30 kg/m 2) ILI participants had 0.099 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.006, 0.259) better mean global cognitive function compared with overweight DSE participants, while obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2) ILI participants had -0.117 (-0.185, -0.049) SD worse mean composite cognitive function scores (interaction p =.014) compared to obese DSE participants. For both overweight and obese participants, cognitive decline was marginally (-0.014 SD/y overall) steeper for ILI participants (p =.068), with 95% CI for differences in slopes excluding 0 for measures of attention and memory. Conclusions The behavioral weight loss intervention was associated with small relative deficits in cognitive function among individuals who were obese and marginally greater cognitive decline overall compared to control. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00017953

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-491
Number of pages8
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume73
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 14 2018

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Cognition
Life Style
Weight Loss
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health
Education
Body Mass Index
Confidence Intervals
Energy Intake
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

for the Action for Health In Diabetes Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Look AHEAD Brain) and Action for Health Movement and Memory Ancillary Study Research Groups (2018). Long-term Impact of Weight Loss Intervention on Changes in Cognitive Function: Exploratory Analyses from the Action for Health in Diabetes Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 73(4), 484-491. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glx165

Long-term Impact of Weight Loss Intervention on Changes in Cognitive Function : Exploratory Analyses from the Action for Health in Diabetes Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. / for the Action for Health In Diabetes Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Look AHEAD Brain) and Action for Health Movement and Memory Ancillary Study Research Groups.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 73, No. 4, 14.03.2018, p. 484-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

for the Action for Health In Diabetes Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Look AHEAD Brain) and Action for Health Movement and Memory Ancillary Study Research Groups 2018, 'Long-term Impact of Weight Loss Intervention on Changes in Cognitive Function: Exploratory Analyses from the Action for Health in Diabetes Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial', Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 73, no. 4, pp. 484-491. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glx165
for the Action for Health In Diabetes Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Look AHEAD Brain) and Action for Health Movement and Memory Ancillary Study Research Groups. Long-term Impact of Weight Loss Intervention on Changes in Cognitive Function: Exploratory Analyses from the Action for Health in Diabetes Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2018 Mar 14;73(4):484-491. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glx165
for the Action for Health In Diabetes Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Look AHEAD Brain) and Action for Health Movement and Memory Ancillary Study Research Groups. / Long-term Impact of Weight Loss Intervention on Changes in Cognitive Function : Exploratory Analyses from the Action for Health in Diabetes Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2018 ; Vol. 73, No. 4. pp. 484-491.
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abstract = "Background Diabetes adversely impacts cognition. Lifestyle change can improve diabetes control and potentially improve cognition. We examined whether weight loss through reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity was associated with slower cognitive aging in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods The Look AHEAD randomized controlled clinical trial delivered 10 years of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) that yielded long-term weight losses. During 5 years spanning the end of intervention and postintervention follow-up, repeated cognitive assessments were obtained in 1,091 individuals who had been assigned to ILI or a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE). We compared the means and slopes of scores on cognitive testing over these repeated assessments. Results Compared with DSE, assignment to ILI was associated with a -0.082 SD deficit in mean global cognitive function across repeated assessments (p =.010). However, overweight (body mass index [BMI] < 30 kg/m 2) ILI participants had 0.099 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: -0.006, 0.259) better mean global cognitive function compared with overweight DSE participants, while obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2) ILI participants had -0.117 (-0.185, -0.049) SD worse mean composite cognitive function scores (interaction p =.014) compared to obese DSE participants. For both overweight and obese participants, cognitive decline was marginally (-0.014 SD/y overall) steeper for ILI participants (p =.068), with 95{\%} CI for differences in slopes excluding 0 for measures of attention and memory. Conclusions The behavioral weight loss intervention was associated with small relative deficits in cognitive function among individuals who were obese and marginally greater cognitive decline overall compared to control. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00017953",
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N2 - Background Diabetes adversely impacts cognition. Lifestyle change can improve diabetes control and potentially improve cognition. We examined whether weight loss through reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity was associated with slower cognitive aging in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods The Look AHEAD randomized controlled clinical trial delivered 10 years of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) that yielded long-term weight losses. During 5 years spanning the end of intervention and postintervention follow-up, repeated cognitive assessments were obtained in 1,091 individuals who had been assigned to ILI or a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE). We compared the means and slopes of scores on cognitive testing over these repeated assessments. Results Compared with DSE, assignment to ILI was associated with a -0.082 SD deficit in mean global cognitive function across repeated assessments (p =.010). However, overweight (body mass index [BMI] < 30 kg/m 2) ILI participants had 0.099 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.006, 0.259) better mean global cognitive function compared with overweight DSE participants, while obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2) ILI participants had -0.117 (-0.185, -0.049) SD worse mean composite cognitive function scores (interaction p =.014) compared to obese DSE participants. For both overweight and obese participants, cognitive decline was marginally (-0.014 SD/y overall) steeper for ILI participants (p =.068), with 95% CI for differences in slopes excluding 0 for measures of attention and memory. Conclusions The behavioral weight loss intervention was associated with small relative deficits in cognitive function among individuals who were obese and marginally greater cognitive decline overall compared to control. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00017953

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