Long-Term Vasodilator Therapy with Trimazosin in Chronic Cardiac Failure

Karl Weber, Gary T. Kinasewitz, James S. West, Joseph S. Janicki, Nathaniel Reichek, Alfred P. Fishman, Karl T. Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with cardiac failure have a generalized sympathetic vasoconstriction that may impair cardiac function and exercise tolerance. The ability of long-term alpha-receptor blockade and vasodilation with trimazosin (TMZ) to improve exercise capacity was studied in patients with chronic, stable heart failure of varying severity (functional exercise classes B to D). Exercise performance was monitored by respiratory gas exchange and air flow before and after patients were randomized to placebo (13 patients) or TMZ (10 patients) for six weeks. Twelve of 13 patients given placebo and subsequently TMZ and 10 patients given TMZ were then followed on treatment for up to 52 weeks. Significant (P<0.05) and sustained increases in exercise capacity, oxygen uptake, and oxygen pulse were observed with TMZ treatment in each Class B or C patient and in six of nine Class D patients, and were not observed during treatment with placebo. (N Engl J Med. 1980; 303: 242–50.) IN low-output cardiac failure, a generalized state of augumented sympathetic-nervous-system activity and vasoconstriction may adversely influence ventricular pump function. In recent years, vasodilators have been used in patients with cardiac failure to counteract this vasoconstriction and improve cardiac performance.1,2 By promoting dilatation of the veins and arteries, vasodilators reduce left ventricular filling volume and pressure and the impedance to ejection. Together, these hemodynamic effects serve to reduce diastolic and systolic wall stress3 and, hence, improve myocardial performance and efficiency.4 Despite the favorable acute response in ventricular function, the ability of vasodilators to improve exercise performance and thereby the quality of.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-250
Number of pages9
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume303
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 31 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vasodilator Agents
Heart Failure
Exercise
Vasoconstriction
Therapeutics
Ventricular Function
Placebos
trimazosin
Oxygen
Exercise Tolerance
Sympathetic Nervous System
Electric Impedance
Vasodilation
Dilatation
Veins
Arteries
Gases
Hemodynamics
Air
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Weber, K., Kinasewitz, G. T., West, J. S., Janicki, J. S., Reichek, N., Fishman, A. P., & Weber, K. T. (1980). Long-Term Vasodilator Therapy with Trimazosin in Chronic Cardiac Failure. New England Journal of Medicine, 303(5), 242-250. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198007313030502

Long-Term Vasodilator Therapy with Trimazosin in Chronic Cardiac Failure. / Weber, Karl; Kinasewitz, Gary T.; West, James S.; Janicki, Joseph S.; Reichek, Nathaniel; Fishman, Alfred P.; Weber, Karl T.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 303, No. 5, 31.07.1980, p. 242-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weber, K, Kinasewitz, GT, West, JS, Janicki, JS, Reichek, N, Fishman, AP & Weber, KT 1980, 'Long-Term Vasodilator Therapy with Trimazosin in Chronic Cardiac Failure', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 303, no. 5, pp. 242-250. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM198007313030502
Weber, Karl ; Kinasewitz, Gary T. ; West, James S. ; Janicki, Joseph S. ; Reichek, Nathaniel ; Fishman, Alfred P. ; Weber, Karl T. / Long-Term Vasodilator Therapy with Trimazosin in Chronic Cardiac Failure. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1980 ; Vol. 303, No. 5. pp. 242-250.
@article{fc55a95e9e274a99a8648f16db3bdc32,
title = "Long-Term Vasodilator Therapy with Trimazosin in Chronic Cardiac Failure",
abstract = "Patients with cardiac failure have a generalized sympathetic vasoconstriction that may impair cardiac function and exercise tolerance. The ability of long-term alpha-receptor blockade and vasodilation with trimazosin (TMZ) to improve exercise capacity was studied in patients with chronic, stable heart failure of varying severity (functional exercise classes B to D). Exercise performance was monitored by respiratory gas exchange and air flow before and after patients were randomized to placebo (13 patients) or TMZ (10 patients) for six weeks. Twelve of 13 patients given placebo and subsequently TMZ and 10 patients given TMZ were then followed on treatment for up to 52 weeks. Significant (P<0.05) and sustained increases in exercise capacity, oxygen uptake, and oxygen pulse were observed with TMZ treatment in each Class B or C patient and in six of nine Class D patients, and were not observed during treatment with placebo. (N Engl J Med. 1980; 303: 242–50.) IN low-output cardiac failure, a generalized state of augumented sympathetic-nervous-system activity and vasoconstriction may adversely influence ventricular pump function. In recent years, vasodilators have been used in patients with cardiac failure to counteract this vasoconstriction and improve cardiac performance.1,2 By promoting dilatation of the veins and arteries, vasodilators reduce left ventricular filling volume and pressure and the impedance to ejection. Together, these hemodynamic effects serve to reduce diastolic and systolic wall stress3 and, hence, improve myocardial performance and efficiency.4 Despite the favorable acute response in ventricular function, the ability of vasodilators to improve exercise performance and thereby the quality of.",
author = "Karl Weber and Kinasewitz, {Gary T.} and West, {James S.} and Janicki, {Joseph S.} and Nathaniel Reichek and Fishman, {Alfred P.} and Weber, {Karl T.}",
year = "1980",
month = "7",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1056/NEJM198007313030502",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "303",
pages = "242--250",
journal = "New England Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0028-4793",
publisher = "Massachussetts Medical Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-Term Vasodilator Therapy with Trimazosin in Chronic Cardiac Failure

AU - Weber, Karl

AU - Kinasewitz, Gary T.

AU - West, James S.

AU - Janicki, Joseph S.

AU - Reichek, Nathaniel

AU - Fishman, Alfred P.

AU - Weber, Karl T.

PY - 1980/7/31

Y1 - 1980/7/31

N2 - Patients with cardiac failure have a generalized sympathetic vasoconstriction that may impair cardiac function and exercise tolerance. The ability of long-term alpha-receptor blockade and vasodilation with trimazosin (TMZ) to improve exercise capacity was studied in patients with chronic, stable heart failure of varying severity (functional exercise classes B to D). Exercise performance was monitored by respiratory gas exchange and air flow before and after patients were randomized to placebo (13 patients) or TMZ (10 patients) for six weeks. Twelve of 13 patients given placebo and subsequently TMZ and 10 patients given TMZ were then followed on treatment for up to 52 weeks. Significant (P<0.05) and sustained increases in exercise capacity, oxygen uptake, and oxygen pulse were observed with TMZ treatment in each Class B or C patient and in six of nine Class D patients, and were not observed during treatment with placebo. (N Engl J Med. 1980; 303: 242–50.) IN low-output cardiac failure, a generalized state of augumented sympathetic-nervous-system activity and vasoconstriction may adversely influence ventricular pump function. In recent years, vasodilators have been used in patients with cardiac failure to counteract this vasoconstriction and improve cardiac performance.1,2 By promoting dilatation of the veins and arteries, vasodilators reduce left ventricular filling volume and pressure and the impedance to ejection. Together, these hemodynamic effects serve to reduce diastolic and systolic wall stress3 and, hence, improve myocardial performance and efficiency.4 Despite the favorable acute response in ventricular function, the ability of vasodilators to improve exercise performance and thereby the quality of.

AB - Patients with cardiac failure have a generalized sympathetic vasoconstriction that may impair cardiac function and exercise tolerance. The ability of long-term alpha-receptor blockade and vasodilation with trimazosin (TMZ) to improve exercise capacity was studied in patients with chronic, stable heart failure of varying severity (functional exercise classes B to D). Exercise performance was monitored by respiratory gas exchange and air flow before and after patients were randomized to placebo (13 patients) or TMZ (10 patients) for six weeks. Twelve of 13 patients given placebo and subsequently TMZ and 10 patients given TMZ were then followed on treatment for up to 52 weeks. Significant (P<0.05) and sustained increases in exercise capacity, oxygen uptake, and oxygen pulse were observed with TMZ treatment in each Class B or C patient and in six of nine Class D patients, and were not observed during treatment with placebo. (N Engl J Med. 1980; 303: 242–50.) IN low-output cardiac failure, a generalized state of augumented sympathetic-nervous-system activity and vasoconstriction may adversely influence ventricular pump function. In recent years, vasodilators have been used in patients with cardiac failure to counteract this vasoconstriction and improve cardiac performance.1,2 By promoting dilatation of the veins and arteries, vasodilators reduce left ventricular filling volume and pressure and the impedance to ejection. Together, these hemodynamic effects serve to reduce diastolic and systolic wall stress3 and, hence, improve myocardial performance and efficiency.4 Despite the favorable acute response in ventricular function, the ability of vasodilators to improve exercise performance and thereby the quality of.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018836312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018836312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1056/NEJM198007313030502

DO - 10.1056/NEJM198007313030502

M3 - Article

VL - 303

SP - 242

EP - 250

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 5

ER -