Longitudinal Change in Forced Expiratory Volume in Healthy, Non-Smoking Men and Women

The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

Jay D. Pearson, Stephanie Y. Kao, Larry J. Brant, E. Metter, Melvyn S. Tockman, James L. Fozard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of age-associated changes in forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1) have varied in the degree of screening for health and smoking, and have not examined age differences in variability in FEV1. Longitudinal rates of change and variability in FEV1 among healthy lifetime-non-smoking White men and women in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) are reported. Longitudinal FEV1 data collected at 2-year in-tervals for up to 28 yr in 91 men (417 observations) and 14 yr in 82 women (248 observations) were modelled using mixed-effects regression models. Longitudinal percentile distributions of FEV1 were calculated which reflect age differences in between-subjects variability. The results show that longitudinal rate of decline in FEV1 is more rapid in men than women (340 ml/decade in men compared to 240-330 ml/decade in women), but similar on a percentage basis (10%) and the difference is not statistically significant; FEV1 decline begins in early adulthood and progresses at a relatively constant rate over the adult lifespan; longitudinal decline in FEV1 in BLSA participants is not statistically different from cross-sectional estimates from the BLSA and Crapo et al. (1981); and between-subjects variability is greater in men than women and increases with age. The results document a relatively steady progressive longitudinal decline in FEV1 in healthy non-smoking White adults, as well as age and gender differences in variability in FEV1. The percentile distribution curves reported here are apparently the first reference values for FEV1 to be derived using longitudinal methods that reflect age-specific differences in variability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-481
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

Fingerprint

Baltimore
Forced Expiratory Volume
longitudinal studies
Longitudinal Studies
smoking
longitudinal study
age difference
life-span
adulthood
Reference Values
gender differences
normal values
Smoking
woman
gender-specific factors
gender
screening
Health
regression
health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Anthropology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Longitudinal Change in Forced Expiratory Volume in Healthy, Non-Smoking Men and Women : The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. / Pearson, Jay D.; Kao, Stephanie Y.; Brant, Larry J.; Metter, E.; Tockman, Melvyn S.; Fozard, James L.

In: American Journal of Human Biology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.12.1998, p. 471-481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pearson, Jay D. ; Kao, Stephanie Y. ; Brant, Larry J. ; Metter, E. ; Tockman, Melvyn S. ; Fozard, James L. / Longitudinal Change in Forced Expiratory Volume in Healthy, Non-Smoking Men and Women : The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. In: American Journal of Human Biology. 1998 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 471-481.
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