Longitudinal study of caries progression in 2- and 3-year-old German children

Vinay Pitchika, Claudia Kokel, Jana Andreeva, Alexander Crispin, Reinhard Hickel, Franklin Garcia-Godoy, Jan Kühnisch, Roswitha Heinrich-Weltzien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This 2-year longitudinal study in 2- and 3-year-old kindergarten children investigated lesion progression on different surfaces of primary teeth. Methods: The study was conducted between September 2008 and September 2010 on a sample of 400 children from the Kyffhäuser district (Thuringia, Germany). A calibrated investigator recorded (non)cavitated caries lesions according to World Health Organization (WHO), International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) and Universal Visual Scoring System (UniViSS) criteria. Nonparametric methods and linear regression using a mixed-effects model with an unbalanced design were used for data analysis. Results: There was a significant increase in the prevalence of noncavitated caries lesions during the 2-year period, with the highest chance for change on all surfaces compared to cavitated lesions. First visible sign lesions on occlusal surfaces had the highest chance for change (estimate 0.38), whereas established lesions revealed the highest chance for change on proximal (estimate 1.05) and smooth surfaces (estimate 0.62). Proximal lesions exhibited the greatest chance for change irrespective of severity level. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that each type of carious lesion had different changing rates. Greater lesion severity correlated with greater chances to change and receive treatment. This information is crucial for dental practitioners in decision-making processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-363
Number of pages10
JournalCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
Deciduous Tooth
Germany
Linear Models
Decision Making
Tooth
Research Personnel
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Longitudinal study of caries progression in 2- and 3-year-old German children. / Pitchika, Vinay; Kokel, Claudia; Andreeva, Jana; Crispin, Alexander; Hickel, Reinhard; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Kühnisch, Jan; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha.

In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 01.08.2016, p. 354-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pitchika, V, Kokel, C, Andreeva, J, Crispin, A, Hickel, R, Garcia-Godoy, F, Kühnisch, J & Heinrich-Weltzien, R 2016, 'Longitudinal study of caries progression in 2- and 3-year-old German children', Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, pp. 354-363. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdoe.12219
Pitchika, Vinay ; Kokel, Claudia ; Andreeva, Jana ; Crispin, Alexander ; Hickel, Reinhard ; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin ; Kühnisch, Jan ; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha. / Longitudinal study of caries progression in 2- and 3-year-old German children. In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology. 2016 ; pp. 354-363.
@article{f41b6cd684b4403e94cc292b62ac903a,
title = "Longitudinal study of caries progression in 2- and 3-year-old German children",
abstract = "Objective: This 2-year longitudinal study in 2- and 3-year-old kindergarten children investigated lesion progression on different surfaces of primary teeth. Methods: The study was conducted between September 2008 and September 2010 on a sample of 400 children from the Kyffh{\"a}user district (Thuringia, Germany). A calibrated investigator recorded (non)cavitated caries lesions according to World Health Organization (WHO), International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) and Universal Visual Scoring System (UniViSS) criteria. Nonparametric methods and linear regression using a mixed-effects model with an unbalanced design were used for data analysis. Results: There was a significant increase in the prevalence of noncavitated caries lesions during the 2-year period, with the highest chance for change on all surfaces compared to cavitated lesions. First visible sign lesions on occlusal surfaces had the highest chance for change (estimate 0.38), whereas established lesions revealed the highest chance for change on proximal (estimate 1.05) and smooth surfaces (estimate 0.62). Proximal lesions exhibited the greatest chance for change irrespective of severity level. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that each type of carious lesion had different changing rates. Greater lesion severity correlated with greater chances to change and receive treatment. This information is crucial for dental practitioners in decision-making processes.",
author = "Vinay Pitchika and Claudia Kokel and Jana Andreeva and Alexander Crispin and Reinhard Hickel and Franklin Garcia-Godoy and Jan K{\"u}hnisch and Roswitha Heinrich-Weltzien",
year = "2016",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/cdoe.12219",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "354--363",
journal = "Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology",
issn = "0301-5661",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Longitudinal study of caries progression in 2- and 3-year-old German children

AU - Pitchika, Vinay

AU - Kokel, Claudia

AU - Andreeva, Jana

AU - Crispin, Alexander

AU - Hickel, Reinhard

AU - Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

AU - Kühnisch, Jan

AU - Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha

PY - 2016/8/1

Y1 - 2016/8/1

N2 - Objective: This 2-year longitudinal study in 2- and 3-year-old kindergarten children investigated lesion progression on different surfaces of primary teeth. Methods: The study was conducted between September 2008 and September 2010 on a sample of 400 children from the Kyffhäuser district (Thuringia, Germany). A calibrated investigator recorded (non)cavitated caries lesions according to World Health Organization (WHO), International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) and Universal Visual Scoring System (UniViSS) criteria. Nonparametric methods and linear regression using a mixed-effects model with an unbalanced design were used for data analysis. Results: There was a significant increase in the prevalence of noncavitated caries lesions during the 2-year period, with the highest chance for change on all surfaces compared to cavitated lesions. First visible sign lesions on occlusal surfaces had the highest chance for change (estimate 0.38), whereas established lesions revealed the highest chance for change on proximal (estimate 1.05) and smooth surfaces (estimate 0.62). Proximal lesions exhibited the greatest chance for change irrespective of severity level. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that each type of carious lesion had different changing rates. Greater lesion severity correlated with greater chances to change and receive treatment. This information is crucial for dental practitioners in decision-making processes.

AB - Objective: This 2-year longitudinal study in 2- and 3-year-old kindergarten children investigated lesion progression on different surfaces of primary teeth. Methods: The study was conducted between September 2008 and September 2010 on a sample of 400 children from the Kyffhäuser district (Thuringia, Germany). A calibrated investigator recorded (non)cavitated caries lesions according to World Health Organization (WHO), International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) and Universal Visual Scoring System (UniViSS) criteria. Nonparametric methods and linear regression using a mixed-effects model with an unbalanced design were used for data analysis. Results: There was a significant increase in the prevalence of noncavitated caries lesions during the 2-year period, with the highest chance for change on all surfaces compared to cavitated lesions. First visible sign lesions on occlusal surfaces had the highest chance for change (estimate 0.38), whereas established lesions revealed the highest chance for change on proximal (estimate 1.05) and smooth surfaces (estimate 0.62). Proximal lesions exhibited the greatest chance for change irrespective of severity level. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that each type of carious lesion had different changing rates. Greater lesion severity correlated with greater chances to change and receive treatment. This information is crucial for dental practitioners in decision-making processes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84990240541&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84990240541&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/cdoe.12219

DO - 10.1111/cdoe.12219

M3 - Article

SP - 354

EP - 363

JO - Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology

JF - Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology

SN - 0301-5661

ER -