Longitudinal study of echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity in sickle cell disease

Payal C. Desai, Ryan C. May, Susan K. Jones, Dell Strayhorn, Melissa Caughey, Alan Hinderliter, Kenneth Ataga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) is associated with increased mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD), its rate of increase and predictive markers of its progression are unknown. We evaluated 55 subjects (median age: 38 years, range: 20-65 years) with at least two measurable TRVs, followed for a median of 4·5 years (range: 1·0-10·5 years) in a single-centre, prospective study. Thirty-one subjects (56%) showed an increase in TRV, while 24 subjects (44%) showed no change or a decrease in TRV. A linear mixed effects model indicated an overall rate of increase in the TRV of 0·02 m/s per year (P = 0·023). The model showed that treatment with hydroxycarbamide was associated with an initial TRV that was 0·20 m/s lower than no such treatment (P = 0·033), while treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers was associated with an increase in the TRV (P = 0·006). In summary, although some patients have clinically meaningful increases, the overall rate of TRV increase is slow. Treatment with hydroxycarbamide may decrease the progression of TRV. Additional studies are required to determine the optimal frequency of screening echocardiography and the effect of therapeutic interventions on the progression of TRV in SCD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)836-841
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume162
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Longitudinal Studies
Echocardiography
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Therapeutic Uses
Therapeutics
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Prospective Studies
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology

Cite this

Longitudinal study of echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity in sickle cell disease. / Desai, Payal C.; May, Ryan C.; Jones, Susan K.; Strayhorn, Dell; Caughey, Melissa; Hinderliter, Alan; Ataga, Kenneth.

In: British Journal of Haematology, Vol. 162, No. 6, 01.09.2013, p. 836-841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Desai, Payal C. ; May, Ryan C. ; Jones, Susan K. ; Strayhorn, Dell ; Caughey, Melissa ; Hinderliter, Alan ; Ataga, Kenneth. / Longitudinal study of echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity in sickle cell disease. In: British Journal of Haematology. 2013 ; Vol. 162, No. 6. pp. 836-841.
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