Loss of root length and creastal bone height before and during treatment in adolescent and adult orthodontic patients

Edward Harris, William C. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is broadly documented that orthodontic tooth movement enhances the risk of apical root resorption and loss of alveolar crestal bone height, but virtually all studies have focused on the conventional adolescent patient. In this study, samples from adolescent and adult patients were matched for sex, malocclusion, and treatment regimen. In-treatment changes in root length were the same for both groups, whereas loss of crestal bone height was somewhat greater in adults. Major differences, however, were found at the start of treatment: Adults (-x = 28 years) had significantly shorter roots and greater alveolar recession than the young teenagers (-x = 12 years). Consequently, treatment per se does not place adults at greater risk; it is the involvement extant at the start of mechanotherapy that merits careful evaluation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-469
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume98
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Orthodontics
Bone and Bones
Root Resorption
Alveolar Bone Loss
Tooth Movement Techniques
Malocclusion
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

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