Low Rates of Adverse Events Following Ambulatory Outpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty at a Free-Standing Surgery Center

Patrick C. Toy, Matthew N. Fournier, Thomas W. Throckmorton, William Mihalko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background We proposed to determine the complication and hospital admission rates for patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) done by a single surgeon in a stand-alone ambulatory surgical center with same-day discharge. Given the recent emphasis on bundled payments for a 90-day episode of care, this same time frame after surgery was chosen to determine patient outcomes. Methods The records of patients with THAs done through a direct anterior approach by a single surgeon at 2 separate ambulatory surgery centers were reviewed. To analyze the learning curve for outpatient THA, the procedures were arbitrarily divided into 2 groups depending on when they were done: early in our experience or later. Complications were recorded, as were hospital admissions and surgical interventions, length of surgery and blood loss, and time spent at the outpatient facility. Results Over a 3-year period, 145 outpatient THAs were done in 125 patients; 73 were considered to be initial procedures, and 72 were considered to be later procedures. Only one of the 145 procedures (0.7%) required transfer from the outpatient facility to the hospital for a blood transfusion. No other direct admissions to the hospital or transfers to the emergency department from the surgery center were necessary. Surgical interventions were required after 3 (2%) of the 145 arthroplasties in the global period (90 days). Conclusion This study demonstrated that same-day discharge to home following THA can be safely done without increased complications, readmissions, reoperations, or emergency room visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-50
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Arthroplasty
Hip
Outpatients
Tacrine
Hospital Emergency Service
Episode of Care
Learning Curve
Patient Admission
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Reoperation
Blood Transfusion
Transfer (Psychology)
Surgeons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Low Rates of Adverse Events Following Ambulatory Outpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty at a Free-Standing Surgery Center. / Toy, Patrick C.; Fournier, Matthew N.; Throckmorton, Thomas W.; Mihalko, William.

In: Journal of Arthroplasty, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 46-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Toy, Patrick C. ; Fournier, Matthew N. ; Throckmorton, Thomas W. ; Mihalko, William. / Low Rates of Adverse Events Following Ambulatory Outpatient Total Hip Arthroplasty at a Free-Standing Surgery Center. In: Journal of Arthroplasty. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 46-50.
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