Lyme disease

Reservoir-targeted vaccines

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In many parts of the world, microbial diseases have been controlled by a combination of improved hygiene practices, surveillance, diagnosis, treatments, effective vaccines, as well as greater public education and awareness of risk factors. Control strategies are especially challenging for diseases caused by pathogens that persist in a mammalian wildlife reservoir and use vectors such as insects to cycle through that species. In this group, the most relevant illnesses that pose a direct human health risk are rabies, sylvatic plague, and Lyme disease [1]. Reservoir-targeted vaccines have been developed as vaccination strategies that target the host reservoir or the transmitting vector both for rabies and for Lyme disease. An example of a successful application is the oral vaccine (Raboral TM) currently used by local governments in the United States to create barriers between infected wildlife and highly populated areas to prevent transmission of rabies. In this chapter I will discuss the development of an oral reservoir-targeted vaccine to curb transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi within wildlife and its projected impact on reduction of the incidence of Lyme disease in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMolecular Vaccines
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Prophylaxis to Therapy-Volume 1
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Vienna
Pages279-293
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9783709114193
ISBN (Print)9783709114186
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Disease Reservoirs
Lyme Disease
Rabies
Vaccines
Local Government
Borrelia burgdorferi
Plague
Hygiene
Insects
Vaccination
Education
Incidence
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Gomes-Solecki, M. (2013). Lyme disease: Reservoir-targeted vaccines. In Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy-Volume 1 (pp. 279-293). Springer-Verlag Vienna. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1419-3_16

Lyme disease : Reservoir-targeted vaccines. / Gomes-Solecki, Maria.

Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy-Volume 1. Springer-Verlag Vienna, 2013. p. 279-293.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gomes-Solecki, M 2013, Lyme disease: Reservoir-targeted vaccines. in Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy-Volume 1. Springer-Verlag Vienna, pp. 279-293. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1419-3_16
Gomes-Solecki M. Lyme disease: Reservoir-targeted vaccines. In Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy-Volume 1. Springer-Verlag Vienna. 2013. p. 279-293 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1419-3_16
Gomes-Solecki, Maria. / Lyme disease : Reservoir-targeted vaccines. Molecular Vaccines: From Prophylaxis to Therapy-Volume 1. Springer-Verlag Vienna, 2013. pp. 279-293
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