Lyme neuroborreliosis manifesting as an intracranial mass lesion

Rhett Murray, Richard Morawetz, John Kepes, Taher El Gammal, Mark Ledoux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lyme neuroborreliosis is one of the chronic manifestations of Lyme disease and is caused by the neurotropic spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Two of the three stages of Lyme disease potentially involve the central nervous system: A second stage that may manifest as meningitis, cranial neuritis, or radiculoneuritis; and a third stage, or chronic neuroborreliosis, with parenchymal involvement. The tertiary stage may mimic many conditions, including multiple sclerosis, polyneuropathy, viral encephalitis, brain tumor, vasculitis, encephalopathy, psychiatric illness, and myelopathy. We report a 10-year-old child with signs, symptoms, and radiological manifestations of intracranial mass lesions, without previously recognized manifestations of Lyme disease. This proved to be Lyme neuroborreleosis, documented by histological and serological examination, which responded well to antibiotic therapy. The need to establish a tissue diagnosis of intracranial mass lesions is emphasized, and the utility of a computed tomographic-guided stereotactic system for this purpose is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-773
Number of pages5
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume30
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Lyme Neuroborreliosis
Lyme Disease
Viral Encephalitis
Neuritis
Spirochaetales
Borrelia burgdorferi
Polyneuropathies
Spinal Cord Diseases
Brain Diseases
Vasculitis
Meningitis
Brain Neoplasms
Multiple Sclerosis
Signs and Symptoms
Psychiatry
Central Nervous System
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Murray, R., Morawetz, R., Kepes, J., El Gammal, T., & Ledoux, M. (1992). Lyme neuroborreliosis manifesting as an intracranial mass lesion. Neurosurgery, 30(5), 769-773.

Lyme neuroborreliosis manifesting as an intracranial mass lesion. / Murray, Rhett; Morawetz, Richard; Kepes, John; El Gammal, Taher; Ledoux, Mark.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 30, No. 5, 01.01.1992, p. 769-773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murray, R, Morawetz, R, Kepes, J, El Gammal, T & Ledoux, M 1992, 'Lyme neuroborreliosis manifesting as an intracranial mass lesion', Neurosurgery, vol. 30, no. 5, pp. 769-773.
Murray R, Morawetz R, Kepes J, El Gammal T, Ledoux M. Lyme neuroborreliosis manifesting as an intracranial mass lesion. Neurosurgery. 1992 Jan 1;30(5):769-773.
Murray, Rhett ; Morawetz, Richard ; Kepes, John ; El Gammal, Taher ; Ledoux, Mark. / Lyme neuroborreliosis manifesting as an intracranial mass lesion. In: Neurosurgery. 1992 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 769-773.
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