Macular pigment optical density is related to cognitive function in older people

Rohini Vishwanathan, Alessandro Iannaccone, Tammy M. Scott, Stephen B. Kritchevsky, Barbara J. Jennings, Giovannella Carboni, Gina Forma, Suzanne Satterfield, Tamara Harris, Karen Johnson, Wolfgang Schalch, Lisa M. Renzi, Caterina Rosano, Elizabeth J. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The xanthophylls lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) exist in relatively high concentration in multiple central nervous tissues (e.g. cortex and neural retina). L + Z in macula (i.e. macular pigment, MP) are thought to serve multiple functions, including protection and improvement of visual performance. Also, L + Z in the macula are related to L + Z in the cortex. Objective: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD, L + Z in the macula) is related to cognitive function in older adults. Methods: Participants were older adults (n = 108, 77.6 ± 2.7 years) sampled from the age-related maculopathy ancillary study of the Health Aging and Body Composition Study (Memphis, TN, USA). Serum carotenoids were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. MPOD was assessed using heterochromatic flicker photometry. Eight cognitive tests designed to evaluate several cognitive domains including memory and processing speed were administered. Partial correlation coefficients were computed to determine whether cognitive measures were related to serum L + Z and MPOD. Results: MPOD levels were significantly associated with better global cognition, verbal learning and fluency, recall, processing speed and perceptual speed, whereas serum L + Z was significantly related to only verbal fluency. Conclusion: MPOD is related to cognitive function in older people. Its role as a potential biomarker of cognitive function deserves further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberaft210
Pages (from-to)271-275
Number of pages5
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

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Cognition
Serum
Xanthophylls
Photometry
Lutein
Nerve Tissue
Verbal Learning
Macular Degeneration
Carotenoids
Body Composition
Retina
Biomarkers
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Macular Pigment
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Vishwanathan, R., Iannaccone, A., Scott, T. M., Kritchevsky, S. B., Jennings, B. J., Carboni, G., ... Johnson, E. J. (2014). Macular pigment optical density is related to cognitive function in older people. Age and Ageing, 43(2), 271-275. [aft210]. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/aft210

Macular pigment optical density is related to cognitive function in older people. / Vishwanathan, Rohini; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Scott, Tammy M.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Jennings, Barbara J.; Carboni, Giovannella; Forma, Gina; Satterfield, Suzanne; Harris, Tamara; Johnson, Karen; Schalch, Wolfgang; Renzi, Lisa M.; Rosano, Caterina; Johnson, Elizabeth J.

In: Age and Ageing, Vol. 43, No. 2, aft210, 01.03.2014, p. 271-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vishwanathan, R, Iannaccone, A, Scott, TM, Kritchevsky, SB, Jennings, BJ, Carboni, G, Forma, G, Satterfield, S, Harris, T, Johnson, K, Schalch, W, Renzi, LM, Rosano, C & Johnson, EJ 2014, 'Macular pigment optical density is related to cognitive function in older people', Age and Ageing, vol. 43, no. 2, aft210, pp. 271-275. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/aft210
Vishwanathan R, Iannaccone A, Scott TM, Kritchevsky SB, Jennings BJ, Carboni G et al. Macular pigment optical density is related to cognitive function in older people. Age and Ageing. 2014 Mar 1;43(2):271-275. aft210. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/aft210
Vishwanathan, Rohini ; Iannaccone, Alessandro ; Scott, Tammy M. ; Kritchevsky, Stephen B. ; Jennings, Barbara J. ; Carboni, Giovannella ; Forma, Gina ; Satterfield, Suzanne ; Harris, Tamara ; Johnson, Karen ; Schalch, Wolfgang ; Renzi, Lisa M. ; Rosano, Caterina ; Johnson, Elizabeth J. / Macular pigment optical density is related to cognitive function in older people. In: Age and Ageing. 2014 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 271-275.
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