Magnesium: Pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic roles in intracerebral hemorrhage

Jason J. Chang, Rocco Armonda, Nitin Goyal, Adam Arthur

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains the second-most common form of stroke with high morbidity and mortality. ICH can be divided into two pathophysiological stages: an acute primary phase, including hematoma volume expansion, and a subacute secondary phase consisting of blood-brain barrier disruption and perihematomal edema expansion. To date, all major trials for ICH have targeted the primary phase with therapies designed to reduce hematoma expansion through blood pressure control, surgical evacuation, and hemostasis. However, none of these trials has resulted in improved clinical outcomes. Magnesium is a ubiquitous element that also plays roles in vasodilation, hemostasis, and blood-brain barrier preservation. Animal models have highlighted potential therapeutic roles for magnesium in neurological diseases specifically targeting these pathophysiological mechanisms. Retrospective studies have also demonstrated inverse associations between admission magnesium levels and hematoma volume, hematoma expansion, and clinical outcome in patients with ICH. These associations, coupled with the multifactorial role of magnesium that targets both primary and secondary phases of ICH, suggest that magnesium may be a viable target of study in future ICH studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1116-1121
Number of pages6
JournalNeural Regeneration Research
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Cerebral Hemorrhage
Magnesium
Hematoma
Hemostasis
Blood-Brain Barrier
Therapeutics
Vasodilation
Edema
Animal Models
Retrospective Studies
Stroke
Blood Pressure
Morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Magnesium : Pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic roles in intracerebral hemorrhage. / Chang, Jason J.; Armonda, Rocco; Goyal, Nitin; Arthur, Adam.

In: Neural Regeneration Research, Vol. 14, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 1116-1121.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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