Magnetic fields from human prefrontal cortex differ during two recognition tasks

Luis F H Basile, Donald G. Brunder, Ina M. Tarkka, Andrew Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study represents our second successful use of magnetoencephalography to identify different sources of human prefrontal activity corresponding to subjects' engagement in different tasks. We used two visual recognition tasks: a familiar person recognition and an abstract pattern recognition task in the context of a design suitable for eliciting Contingent Negative Variations (CNVs) and their concurrent slow magnetic fields in this preliminary study of 5 subjects. Each trial of either task was started by one of two specific warning symbols (S1), indicating whether a person's picture or an abstract pattern should be attended during the presentation of a second stimulus (S2), and compared to the corresponding person's picture or pattern contained in the third stimulus, (S3) that followed. The S2 and S3 stimuli were common to both tasks, and were composed of patterns made with four line traces superimposed on photographs of persons familiar to each subject. Subjects responded with a right hand button press, following S3, indicating their judgments regarding the identity of the patterns or persons' pictures contained in the S2 and the S3 stimuli, for the two tasks, respectively. Results showed that the sources of the CNV equivalent magnetic fields were localized in different cortical regions depending on the task and that this difference was consistent across all subjects. The sources were localized in the right hemisphere, in medial areas of the prefrontal cortex for the person recognition task and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for the pattern recognition task. The same degree of consistency was not found for the left hemisphere sources. Moreover, as in our previous study, we found no difference between the sources active during the first and the second CNV periods (occurring during the S1-S2 and the S2-S3 intervals, respectively), within each task condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-41
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1997

Fingerprint

Magnetic Fields
Prefrontal Cortex
Contingent Negative Variation
Magnetoencephalography
Human Activities
Recognition (Psychology)
Hand

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Magnetic fields from human prefrontal cortex differ during two recognition tasks. / Basile, Luis F H; Brunder, Donald G.; Tarkka, Ina M.; Papanicolaou, Andrew.

In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.07.1997, p. 29-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Basile, Luis F H ; Brunder, Donald G. ; Tarkka, Ina M. ; Papanicolaou, Andrew. / Magnetic fields from human prefrontal cortex differ during two recognition tasks. In: International Journal of Psychophysiology. 1997 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 29-41.
@article{d0b205172bf746fe9c58aeda2b85a7e3,
title = "Magnetic fields from human prefrontal cortex differ during two recognition tasks",
abstract = "The present study represents our second successful use of magnetoencephalography to identify different sources of human prefrontal activity corresponding to subjects' engagement in different tasks. We used two visual recognition tasks: a familiar person recognition and an abstract pattern recognition task in the context of a design suitable for eliciting Contingent Negative Variations (CNVs) and their concurrent slow magnetic fields in this preliminary study of 5 subjects. Each trial of either task was started by one of two specific warning symbols (S1), indicating whether a person's picture or an abstract pattern should be attended during the presentation of a second stimulus (S2), and compared to the corresponding person's picture or pattern contained in the third stimulus, (S3) that followed. The S2 and S3 stimuli were common to both tasks, and were composed of patterns made with four line traces superimposed on photographs of persons familiar to each subject. Subjects responded with a right hand button press, following S3, indicating their judgments regarding the identity of the patterns or persons' pictures contained in the S2 and the S3 stimuli, for the two tasks, respectively. Results showed that the sources of the CNV equivalent magnetic fields were localized in different cortical regions depending on the task and that this difference was consistent across all subjects. The sources were localized in the right hemisphere, in medial areas of the prefrontal cortex for the person recognition task and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for the pattern recognition task. The same degree of consistency was not found for the left hemisphere sources. Moreover, as in our previous study, we found no difference between the sources active during the first and the second CNV periods (occurring during the S1-S2 and the S2-S3 intervals, respectively), within each task condition.",
author = "Basile, {Luis F H} and Brunder, {Donald G.} and Tarkka, {Ina M.} and Andrew Papanicolaou",
year = "1997",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0167-8760(97)00784-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "29--41",
journal = "International Journal of Psychophysiology",
issn = "0167-8760",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Magnetic fields from human prefrontal cortex differ during two recognition tasks

AU - Basile, Luis F H

AU - Brunder, Donald G.

AU - Tarkka, Ina M.

AU - Papanicolaou, Andrew

PY - 1997/7/1

Y1 - 1997/7/1

N2 - The present study represents our second successful use of magnetoencephalography to identify different sources of human prefrontal activity corresponding to subjects' engagement in different tasks. We used two visual recognition tasks: a familiar person recognition and an abstract pattern recognition task in the context of a design suitable for eliciting Contingent Negative Variations (CNVs) and their concurrent slow magnetic fields in this preliminary study of 5 subjects. Each trial of either task was started by one of two specific warning symbols (S1), indicating whether a person's picture or an abstract pattern should be attended during the presentation of a second stimulus (S2), and compared to the corresponding person's picture or pattern contained in the third stimulus, (S3) that followed. The S2 and S3 stimuli were common to both tasks, and were composed of patterns made with four line traces superimposed on photographs of persons familiar to each subject. Subjects responded with a right hand button press, following S3, indicating their judgments regarding the identity of the patterns or persons' pictures contained in the S2 and the S3 stimuli, for the two tasks, respectively. Results showed that the sources of the CNV equivalent magnetic fields were localized in different cortical regions depending on the task and that this difference was consistent across all subjects. The sources were localized in the right hemisphere, in medial areas of the prefrontal cortex for the person recognition task and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for the pattern recognition task. The same degree of consistency was not found for the left hemisphere sources. Moreover, as in our previous study, we found no difference between the sources active during the first and the second CNV periods (occurring during the S1-S2 and the S2-S3 intervals, respectively), within each task condition.

AB - The present study represents our second successful use of magnetoencephalography to identify different sources of human prefrontal activity corresponding to subjects' engagement in different tasks. We used two visual recognition tasks: a familiar person recognition and an abstract pattern recognition task in the context of a design suitable for eliciting Contingent Negative Variations (CNVs) and their concurrent slow magnetic fields in this preliminary study of 5 subjects. Each trial of either task was started by one of two specific warning symbols (S1), indicating whether a person's picture or an abstract pattern should be attended during the presentation of a second stimulus (S2), and compared to the corresponding person's picture or pattern contained in the third stimulus, (S3) that followed. The S2 and S3 stimuli were common to both tasks, and were composed of patterns made with four line traces superimposed on photographs of persons familiar to each subject. Subjects responded with a right hand button press, following S3, indicating their judgments regarding the identity of the patterns or persons' pictures contained in the S2 and the S3 stimuli, for the two tasks, respectively. Results showed that the sources of the CNV equivalent magnetic fields were localized in different cortical regions depending on the task and that this difference was consistent across all subjects. The sources were localized in the right hemisphere, in medial areas of the prefrontal cortex for the person recognition task and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for the pattern recognition task. The same degree of consistency was not found for the left hemisphere sources. Moreover, as in our previous study, we found no difference between the sources active during the first and the second CNV periods (occurring during the S1-S2 and the S2-S3 intervals, respectively), within each task condition.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030987735&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030987735&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0167-8760(97)00784-8

DO - 10.1016/S0167-8760(97)00784-8

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 29

EP - 41

JO - International Journal of Psychophysiology

JF - International Journal of Psychophysiology

SN - 0167-8760

IS - 1

ER -