Magnetoencephalographic Studies of Language Reorganization After Cerebral Insult

Joshua I. Breier, Rebecca Billingsley-Marshall, Ekaterina Pataraia, Eduardo M. Castillo, Andrew C. Papanicolaou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breier JI, Billingsley-Marshall R, Pataraia E, Castillo EM, Papanicolaou AC. Magnetoencephalographic studies of language reorganization after cerebral insult. We review our experience with the application of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to the study of reorganization of the mechanisms supporting auditory language comprehension. In 3 studies, patient populations with cerebral insult of differing etiology, including epilepsy, surgical resection, and stroke, performed a running recognition task for spoken words while MEG data were collected using a whole-head magnetometer. Increased activation in the right hemisphere after left temporal lobectomy was associated with greater relative activation in that hemisphere preoperatively. Patients with chronic seizure disorder secondary to mesial temporal sclerosis exhibited a tendency toward an interhemispheric shift of language function, and those with epilepsy secondary to neoplasm showed a tendency toward an intrahemispheric shift. Patients with aphasia secondary to unilateral left-hemisphere stroke exhibited a more bilateral and diffuse overall profile of activation within the left hemisphere than control subjects of similar age. Taken together, results provide evidence that reorganization of cortex subserving auditory comprehension can occur well into the fifth and sixth decades and that the nature of the plastic response is dependent on variables such as premorbid language laterality, etiology, and, in specific groups, age at insult.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-83
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume87
Issue number12 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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Language
Magnetoencephalography
Epilepsy
Stroke
Auditory Cortex
Aphasia
Sclerosis
Plastics
Age Groups
Head
Population
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Breier, J. I., Billingsley-Marshall, R., Pataraia, E., Castillo, E. M., & Papanicolaou, A. C. (2006). Magnetoencephalographic Studies of Language Reorganization After Cerebral Insult. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 87(12 SUPPL.), 77-83. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2006.07.271

Magnetoencephalographic Studies of Language Reorganization After Cerebral Insult. / Breier, Joshua I.; Billingsley-Marshall, Rebecca; Pataraia, Ekaterina; Castillo, Eduardo M.; Papanicolaou, Andrew C.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 87, No. 12 SUPPL., 01.12.2006, p. 77-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Breier, JI, Billingsley-Marshall, R, Pataraia, E, Castillo, EM & Papanicolaou, AC 2006, 'Magnetoencephalographic Studies of Language Reorganization After Cerebral Insult', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 87, no. 12 SUPPL., pp. 77-83. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2006.07.271
Breier, Joshua I. ; Billingsley-Marshall, Rebecca ; Pataraia, Ekaterina ; Castillo, Eduardo M. ; Papanicolaou, Andrew C. / Magnetoencephalographic Studies of Language Reorganization After Cerebral Insult. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2006 ; Vol. 87, No. 12 SUPPL. pp. 77-83.
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