Major hepatic resection

An update

William Edwards, John L. Sawyers, R. Benton Adkins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In 1981, we reported a series of 75 major hepatic resections done over a ten-year period; 58 were for hepatic trauma, nine were for benign disease, and eight were for malignant disease. Since that report, the indications for major hepatic resection have changed, with a more conservative approach to hepatic trauma and a more aggressive approach toward hepatic tumors. In this update, we report 88 hepatic resections from Vanderbilt University Hospital and Metropolitan Nashville General Hospital; 32 were for trauma, 25 were for benign disorders, and 31 were for malignant disease. Since 1977, nine adults and four children have had hepatic resection for primary malignant tumors; there were six hepatocellular lesions, three hepatoblastomas, two malignant hemangioendotheliomas, one malignant hepatoma, and one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. At the time of this writing, the four children have survived for 7.3, 6, 6, and 3.8 years (mean 5.7), and all are alive without evidence of recurrence. For the nine adults, survival has averaged 1.7 years, excluding one postoperative death. Three adult patients are alive at this writing, one of whom is a five-year survivor without evidence of disease. Seventeen adults and one child had hepatic resection for metastatic lesions. In the adults, the primary tumor was in the colon in 14 cases and in the small bowel, stomach, and an unknown site in one case each. The one child had a metastatic Wilms’ tumor. Survival has averaged two years, with two long-term survivors (nine years). Six patients are alive at this time. Operative mortality for elective resection has decreased from 12% (2/17) in our earlier report to 3% (1/31) in this series, which has encouraged us to assume a more aggressive approach to the resection of malignant primary and metastatic liver tumors.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)18-22
    Number of pages5
    JournalSouthern Medical Journal
    Volume83
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

    Fingerprint

    Liver
    Survivors
    Neoplasms
    Wounds and Injuries
    Hemangioendothelioma
    Hepatoblastoma
    Survival
    Cholangiocarcinoma
    Wilms Tumor
    General Hospitals
    Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    Stomach
    Colon
    Recurrence
    Mortality

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Edwards, W., Sawyers, J. L., & Adkins, R. B. (1990). Major hepatic resection: An update. Southern Medical Journal, 83(1), 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007611-199001000-00007

    Major hepatic resection : An update. / Edwards, William; Sawyers, John L.; Adkins, R. Benton.

    In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 83, No. 1, 01.01.1990, p. 18-22.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Edwards, W, Sawyers, JL & Adkins, RB 1990, 'Major hepatic resection: An update', Southern Medical Journal, vol. 83, no. 1, pp. 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007611-199001000-00007
    Edwards, William ; Sawyers, John L. ; Adkins, R. Benton. / Major hepatic resection : An update. In: Southern Medical Journal. 1990 ; Vol. 83, No. 1. pp. 18-22.
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