Male gender significantly increases risk of oxidative stress related congenital anomalies in the non-diabetic population

Ray O. Bahado-Singh, Mauro Schenone, Marcos Cordoba, Wen Shi Shieh, Devika Maulik, Michael Kruger, E. Albert Reece

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Oxidative stress (OS) is an important mechanism of teratogenesis. Recent work suggests increased OS in males. We evaluated whether male gender increased the risk of cyanotic congenital heart defects (CCHD) whose development is linked to OS and other common congenital anomalies (CA) in non-diabetic pregnancies. Methods. CDC-National Center for Health Statistics data for 19 states in 2006 were reviewed. CCHD, anencephaly, spina bifida, congenial diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), omphalocele, gastroschisis, limb defects, cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and isolated cleft palate were evaluated. Adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) were calculated for CA in males with females as the reference group. Results. Of 1,194, 581, cases analyzed after exclusions, 3037 (0.25%) had major CA. Males had elevated adjusted OR (95% CI) for CCHD: 1.198 (1.027, 1.397), CDH: 1.487 (1.078, 2.051), and CL/P: 1.431 (1.24, 1.651). There was a significant interaction between cigarette use and (male) fetal gender and also with maternal age in the CL/P group. Conclusions. In non-diabetic pregnancies, male gender appears to be an independent risk factor for some types of CA believed to be associated with OS. Cigarette smoking, a well recognized source of OS only increased the risk of CL/P in males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-691
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Oxidative Stress
Cleft Palate
Congenital Heart Defects
Population
Pregnancy in Diabetics
Diaphragmatic Hernia
Odds Ratio
Gastroschisis
Teratogenesis
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
Umbilical Hernia
Cleft Lip
Maternal Age
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Tobacco Products
Extremities
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Male gender significantly increases risk of oxidative stress related congenital anomalies in the non-diabetic population. / Bahado-Singh, Ray O.; Schenone, Mauro; Cordoba, Marcos; Shieh, Wen Shi; Maulik, Devika; Kruger, Michael; Reece, E. Albert.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.05.2011, p. 687-691.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bahado-Singh, Ray O. ; Schenone, Mauro ; Cordoba, Marcos ; Shieh, Wen Shi ; Maulik, Devika ; Kruger, Michael ; Reece, E. Albert. / Male gender significantly increases risk of oxidative stress related congenital anomalies in the non-diabetic population. In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 24, No. 5. pp. 687-691.
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