Management of acid-related disorders in patients with dysphagia.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dysphagia affects a large and growing number of individuals in the United States, particularly the elderly and those who are neurologically impaired. Swallowing difficulties may be due to age-related changes in oropharyngeal and esophageal functioning as well as central nervous system diseases such as stroke, Parkinson disease, and dementia. Among institutionalized individuals, dysphagia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. An appreciation of the physiology of swallowing and the pathophysiology of dysphagia is necessary for proper patient management. Careful history, physical examination, and evaluation of radiologic and endoscopic studies should differentiate oropharyngeal and esophageal etiologies of dysphagia and distinguish mechanical (anatomic) disorders from functional (motor) disorders. A significant percentage of patients with dysphagia have concomitant acid-related disorders that are managed best with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Three of the currently available PPIs are manufactured as capsules containing enteric-coated granules that may be mixed with soft foods or fruit juices before oral administration to those with swallowing difficulties. In addition, omeprazole and lansoprazole may be administered via gastrostomy or nasogastric feeding tubes as suspensions in sodium bicarbonate. Novel dosage formulations of lansoprazole that may be appropriate for patients with dysphagia include the commercially manufactured lansoprazole strawberry-flavored enteric-coated granules for suspension and lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American Journal of Medicine
Volume117 Suppl 5A
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Deglutition Disorders
Lansoprazole
Acids
Deglutition
Suspensions
Fragaria
Sodium Bicarbonate
Gastrostomy
Omeprazole
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Central Nervous System Diseases
Enteral Nutrition
Tablets
Physical Examination
Capsules
Oral Administration
Parkinson Disease
Dementia
History
Stroke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Management of acid-related disorders in patients with dysphagia. / Howden, Colin.

In: The American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 117 Suppl 5A, 01.01.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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