Management of Medical Problems in Pregnancy — Severe Cardiac Disease

Jay M. Sullivan, K Ramanathan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although both maternal and cardiovascular mortality have declined during the past decade, the apparent prevalence of cardiovascular disorders in pregnant patients has remained relatively constant because of three medical advances. These include more accurate diagnostic techniques; improved management, which now makes pregnancy possible for some women who might not have attempted childbirth in the past; and surgical correction of congenital cardiac lesions, which has created a new category of patients reaching childbearing age. The prevalence of heart disease during pregnancy ranges from 0.4 to 4.1 per cent, and maternal mortality ranges from 0.4 per cent among patients in Class I.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-309
Number of pages6
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume313
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1985

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Heart Diseases
Maternal Mortality
Pregnancy
Parturition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Management of Medical Problems in Pregnancy — Severe Cardiac Disease. / Sullivan, Jay M.; Ramanathan, K.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 313, No. 5, 01.08.1985, p. 304-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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