Manual disfluency in drawing while producing and listening to disfluent speech

Vikram Dayalu, Hans Leo Teulings, Andrew Bowers, Stephen Crawcour, Tim Saltuklaroglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the extent to which manual fluency was associated with speech fluency in fluent speakers engaged in dual motor tasks. Thirteen right-handed adult females repeatedly drew circles with a pen on a digitizer tablet under five conditions: (1) a baseline (without reading or listening to speech), (2) reading fluently, (3) reading disfluently, (4) listening to fluent speech, and (5) listening to disfluent speech. The primary measure of disfluency was normalized mean squared jerk (NJ) in the pen strokes. Pen stroke time (ST) and pressure (PP) were also measured. NJ of the circle movements was significantly increased in both the disfluent reading and the disfluent listening conditions ( p<. 0.05), compared to the baseline condition. In the fluent listening and reading conditions, NJ in circle drawing was unaltered compared to the baseline condition. Relative to baseline, ST increased significantly ( p<. 0.05), but to a similar extent in all experimental conditions. Significantly ( p<. .05) greater pen pressure were also found in the disfluent versus fluent conditions. Positive correlations ( r= 0.33-0.63) were found between NJ and ST across conditions. These findings demonstrate that in dual-tasks, speech fluency can influence manual fluency. This is consistent with the corpus of data showing neural connectivity between manual and speech tasks, as well between perception and production. The mirror neuron system is implicated as a mechanism involved in forging these links.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-690
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reading
Stroke
Mirror Neurons
Pressure
Tablets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Manual disfluency in drawing while producing and listening to disfluent speech. / Dayalu, Vikram; Teulings, Hans Leo; Bowers, Andrew; Crawcour, Stephen; Saltuklaroglu, Tim.

In: Human Movement Science, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.08.2013, p. 677-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dayalu, Vikram ; Teulings, Hans Leo ; Bowers, Andrew ; Crawcour, Stephen ; Saltuklaroglu, Tim. / Manual disfluency in drawing while producing and listening to disfluent speech. In: Human Movement Science. 2013 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 677-690.
@article{5b99310bcd554b3eb9bf35fce68a89dc,
title = "Manual disfluency in drawing while producing and listening to disfluent speech",
abstract = "This study investigated the extent to which manual fluency was associated with speech fluency in fluent speakers engaged in dual motor tasks. Thirteen right-handed adult females repeatedly drew circles with a pen on a digitizer tablet under five conditions: (1) a baseline (without reading or listening to speech), (2) reading fluently, (3) reading disfluently, (4) listening to fluent speech, and (5) listening to disfluent speech. The primary measure of disfluency was normalized mean squared jerk (NJ) in the pen strokes. Pen stroke time (ST) and pressure (PP) were also measured. NJ of the circle movements was significantly increased in both the disfluent reading and the disfluent listening conditions ( p<. 0.05), compared to the baseline condition. In the fluent listening and reading conditions, NJ in circle drawing was unaltered compared to the baseline condition. Relative to baseline, ST increased significantly ( p<. 0.05), but to a similar extent in all experimental conditions. Significantly ( p<. .05) greater pen pressure were also found in the disfluent versus fluent conditions. Positive correlations ( r= 0.33-0.63) were found between NJ and ST across conditions. These findings demonstrate that in dual-tasks, speech fluency can influence manual fluency. This is consistent with the corpus of data showing neural connectivity between manual and speech tasks, as well between perception and production. The mirror neuron system is implicated as a mechanism involved in forging these links.",
author = "Vikram Dayalu and Teulings, {Hans Leo} and Andrew Bowers and Stephen Crawcour and Tim Saltuklaroglu",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.humov.2012.12.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "677--690",
journal = "Human Movement Science",
issn = "0167-9457",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Manual disfluency in drawing while producing and listening to disfluent speech

AU - Dayalu, Vikram

AU - Teulings, Hans Leo

AU - Bowers, Andrew

AU - Crawcour, Stephen

AU - Saltuklaroglu, Tim

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - This study investigated the extent to which manual fluency was associated with speech fluency in fluent speakers engaged in dual motor tasks. Thirteen right-handed adult females repeatedly drew circles with a pen on a digitizer tablet under five conditions: (1) a baseline (without reading or listening to speech), (2) reading fluently, (3) reading disfluently, (4) listening to fluent speech, and (5) listening to disfluent speech. The primary measure of disfluency was normalized mean squared jerk (NJ) in the pen strokes. Pen stroke time (ST) and pressure (PP) were also measured. NJ of the circle movements was significantly increased in both the disfluent reading and the disfluent listening conditions ( p<. 0.05), compared to the baseline condition. In the fluent listening and reading conditions, NJ in circle drawing was unaltered compared to the baseline condition. Relative to baseline, ST increased significantly ( p<. 0.05), but to a similar extent in all experimental conditions. Significantly ( p<. .05) greater pen pressure were also found in the disfluent versus fluent conditions. Positive correlations ( r= 0.33-0.63) were found between NJ and ST across conditions. These findings demonstrate that in dual-tasks, speech fluency can influence manual fluency. This is consistent with the corpus of data showing neural connectivity between manual and speech tasks, as well between perception and production. The mirror neuron system is implicated as a mechanism involved in forging these links.

AB - This study investigated the extent to which manual fluency was associated with speech fluency in fluent speakers engaged in dual motor tasks. Thirteen right-handed adult females repeatedly drew circles with a pen on a digitizer tablet under five conditions: (1) a baseline (without reading or listening to speech), (2) reading fluently, (3) reading disfluently, (4) listening to fluent speech, and (5) listening to disfluent speech. The primary measure of disfluency was normalized mean squared jerk (NJ) in the pen strokes. Pen stroke time (ST) and pressure (PP) were also measured. NJ of the circle movements was significantly increased in both the disfluent reading and the disfluent listening conditions ( p<. 0.05), compared to the baseline condition. In the fluent listening and reading conditions, NJ in circle drawing was unaltered compared to the baseline condition. Relative to baseline, ST increased significantly ( p<. 0.05), but to a similar extent in all experimental conditions. Significantly ( p<. .05) greater pen pressure were also found in the disfluent versus fluent conditions. Positive correlations ( r= 0.33-0.63) were found between NJ and ST across conditions. These findings demonstrate that in dual-tasks, speech fluency can influence manual fluency. This is consistent with the corpus of data showing neural connectivity between manual and speech tasks, as well between perception and production. The mirror neuron system is implicated as a mechanism involved in forging these links.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84884290641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84884290641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.humov.2012.12.003

DO - 10.1016/j.humov.2012.12.003

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 677

EP - 690

JO - Human Movement Science

JF - Human Movement Science

SN - 0167-9457

IS - 4

ER -