Mapping critical hubs of receptive and expressive language using MEG

A comparison against fMRI

Vahab Youssofzadeh, Abbas Babajani-Feremi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The complexity of the widespread language network makes it challenging for accurate localization and lateralization. Using large-scale connectivity and graph-theoretical analyses of task-based magnetoencephalography (MEG), we aimed to provide robust representations of receptive and expressive language processes, comparable with spatial profiles of corresponding functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We examined MEG and fMRI data from 12 healthy young adults (age 20–37 years) completing covert auditory word-recognition task (WRT) and covert auditory verb-generation task (VGT). For MEG language mapping, broadband (3–30 Hz) beamformer sources were estimated, voxel-level connectivity was quantified using phase locking value, and highly connected hubs were characterized using eigenvector centrality graph measure. fMRI data were analyzed using a classic general linear model approach. A laterality index (LI) was computed for 20 language-specific frontotemporal regions for both MEG and fMRI. MEG network analysis showed bilateral and symmetrically distributed hubs within the left and right superior temporal gyrus (STG) during WRT and predominant hubs in left inferior prefrontal gyrus (IFG) during VGT. MEG and fMRI localization maps showed high correlation values within frontotemporal regions during WRT and VGT (r = 0.63, 0.74, q < 0.05, respectively). Despite good concordance in localization, notable discordances were observed in lateralization between MEG and fMRI. During WRT, MEG favored a left-hemispheric dominance of left STG (LI = 0.25 ± 0.22) whereas fMRI supported a bilateral representation of STG (LI = 0.08 ± 0.2). Laterality of MEG and fMRI during VGT consistently showed a strong asymmetry in left IFG regions (MEG-LI = 0.45 ± 0.35 and fMRI-LI = 0.46 ± 0.13). Our results demonstrate the utility of a large-scale connectivity and graph theoretical analyses for robust identification of language-specific regions. MEG hubs are in great agreement with the literature in revealing with canonical and extra-canonical language sites, thus providing additional support for the underlying topological organization of receptive and expressive language cortices. Discordances in lateralization may emphasize the need for multimodal integration of MEG and fMRI to obtain an excellent predictive value in a heterogeneous healthy population and patients with neurosurgical conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116029
JournalNeuroImage
Volume201
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

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Magnetoencephalography
Language
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Temporal Lobe
Young Adult
Linear Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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Mapping critical hubs of receptive and expressive language using MEG : A comparison against fMRI. / Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 201, 116029, 01.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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