Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene hernia mesh

Patient factor correlation

Sarah E. Smith, Matthew J. Cozad, David A. Grant, Bruce Ramshaw, Sheila A. Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study quantitatively assessed polypropylene (PP) hernia mesh degradation and its correlation with patient factors including body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status with the goal of improving hernia repair outcomes through patient-matched mesh. Thirty PP hernia mesh explants were subjected to a tissue removal process followed by assessment of their in vivo degradation using Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis analyses. Results were then analyzed with respect to patient factors (body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status) to determine their influence on in vivo hernia mesh oxidation and degradation. Twenty of the explants show significant surface oxidation. Tobacco use exhibits a positive correlation with modulated differential scanning calorimetry melt temperature and exhibits significantly lower TGA decomposition temperatures than non-/past users. Chemical and thermal characterization of the explanted meshes indicate measurable degradation while in vivo regardless of the patient population; however, tobacco use is correlated with less oxidation and degradation of the polymeric mesh possibly due to a reduced inflammatory response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1026-1035
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomaterials Applications
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Polypropylenes
Tobacco
Degradation
Medical problems
Oxidation
Differential scanning calorimetry
Thermogravimetric analysis
Fourier transforms
Repair
Tissue
Infrared radiation
Decomposition
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene hernia mesh : Patient factor correlation. / Smith, Sarah E.; Cozad, Matthew J.; Grant, David A.; Ramshaw, Bruce; Grant, Sheila A.

In: Journal of Biomaterials Applications, Vol. 30, No. 7, 01.02.2016, p. 1026-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Sarah E. ; Cozad, Matthew J. ; Grant, David A. ; Ramshaw, Bruce ; Grant, Sheila A. / Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene hernia mesh : Patient factor correlation. In: Journal of Biomaterials Applications. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 7. pp. 1026-1035.
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