Maternal health of undocumented women with and without medicaid access in Nebraska, 2007-2011

Danielle N. Atkins, Cristina S. Barroso, Amy J. Anderson, John Meadows, Lisa C. Lindley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Four million infants are born in the United States to undocumented mothers. Nebraska granted Medicaid access to undocumented pregnant women from 1996 to 2010 and then discontinued access from 2010 to 2012. However, little is known about the maternal health of these undocumented women. The purpose of this study was to compare maternal health of undocumented women with and without access to Medicaid in Nebraska from 2007 to 2011. Method: A retrospective, longitudinal cohort design was conducted with 2007 to 2011 Nebraska birth certificate data. Study participants were 6,262 undocumented women. Groups of measures were created for demographics, prenatal, pregnancy, and delivery characteristics. Descriptive statistics were calculated and comparisons were conducted between women with and without access to Medicaid using chi-square and Student t tests. Results: More than 60% of undocumented women had access to Medicaid, while 32% had no access to Medicaid. Undocumented women were predominately Hispanic (73.32%) and did not have a high school education (68.77%). The comparison of undocumented women with and without Medicaid revealed that women with Medicaid access had more than adequate prenatal care (17.86% vs. 14.80%) and a higher frequency of infant born with abnormal conditions (6.26% vs. 8.03%). Women without access to Medicaid more often had inadequate prenatal care (10.28% vs. 6.94%) and were obese prior to pregnancy (19.37% vs. 17.37%). Conclusions: Undocumented women who are prenatally obese and lack access to prenatal care may be at increased risk for poor maternal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-19
Number of pages7
JournalHispanic Health Care International
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Medicaid
Prenatal Care
Mothers
Maternal Health
Birth Certificates
Pregnancy
Hispanic Americans
Pregnant Women
Demography
Students
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

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Maternal health of undocumented women with and without medicaid access in Nebraska, 2007-2011. / Atkins, Danielle N.; Barroso, Cristina S.; Anderson, Amy J.; Meadows, John; Lindley, Lisa C.

In: Hispanic Health Care International, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 13-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Atkins, Danielle N. ; Barroso, Cristina S. ; Anderson, Amy J. ; Meadows, John ; Lindley, Lisa C. / Maternal health of undocumented women with and without medicaid access in Nebraska, 2007-2011. In: Hispanic Health Care International. 2017 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 13-19.
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abstract = "Introduction: Four million infants are born in the United States to undocumented mothers. Nebraska granted Medicaid access to undocumented pregnant women from 1996 to 2010 and then discontinued access from 2010 to 2012. However, little is known about the maternal health of these undocumented women. The purpose of this study was to compare maternal health of undocumented women with and without access to Medicaid in Nebraska from 2007 to 2011. Method: A retrospective, longitudinal cohort design was conducted with 2007 to 2011 Nebraska birth certificate data. Study participants were 6,262 undocumented women. Groups of measures were created for demographics, prenatal, pregnancy, and delivery characteristics. Descriptive statistics were calculated and comparisons were conducted between women with and without access to Medicaid using chi-square and Student t tests. Results: More than 60{\%} of undocumented women had access to Medicaid, while 32{\%} had no access to Medicaid. Undocumented women were predominately Hispanic (73.32{\%}) and did not have a high school education (68.77{\%}). The comparison of undocumented women with and without Medicaid revealed that women with Medicaid access had more than adequate prenatal care (17.86{\%} vs. 14.80{\%}) and a higher frequency of infant born with abnormal conditions (6.26{\%} vs. 8.03{\%}). Women without access to Medicaid more often had inadequate prenatal care (10.28{\%} vs. 6.94{\%}) and were obese prior to pregnancy (19.37{\%} vs. 17.37{\%}). Conclusions: Undocumented women who are prenatally obese and lack access to prenatal care may be at increased risk for poor maternal outcomes.",
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