Maternal immunization

Opportunities for scientific advancement

Richard H. Beigi, Kimberly Fortner, Flor M. Munoz, Jeff Roberts, Jennifer L. Gordon, Htay Htay Han, Greg Glenn, Philip R. Dormitzer, Xing Xing Gu, Jennifer S. Read, Kathryn Edwards, Shital M. Patel, Geeta K. Swamy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maternal immunization is an effective strategy to prevent and/or minimize the severity of infectious diseases in pregnant women and their infants. Based on the success of vaccination programs to prevent maternal and neonatal tetanus, maternal immunization has been well received in the United States and globally as a promising strategy for the prevention of other vaccine-preventable diseases that threaten pregnant women and infants, such as influenza and pertussis. Given the promise for reducing the burden of infectious conditions of perinatal significance through the development of vaccines against relevant pathogens, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored a series of meetings to foster progress toward clinical development of vaccines for use in pregnancy. A multidisciplinary group of stakeholders convened at the NIH in December 2013 to identify potential barriers and opportunities for scientific advancement in maternal immunization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S404-S414
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Immunization
Mothers
Vaccines
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Communicable Diseases
Pregnant Women
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (U.S.)
Whooping Cough
Tetanus
Microbiology
Human Influenza
Vaccination
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Beigi, R. H., Fortner, K., Munoz, F. M., Roberts, J., Gordon, J. L., Han, H. H., ... Swamy, G. K. (2014). Maternal immunization: Opportunities for scientific advancement. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 59, S404-S414. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu708

Maternal immunization : Opportunities for scientific advancement. / Beigi, Richard H.; Fortner, Kimberly; Munoz, Flor M.; Roberts, Jeff; Gordon, Jennifer L.; Han, Htay Htay; Glenn, Greg; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Gu, Xing Xing; Read, Jennifer S.; Edwards, Kathryn; Patel, Shital M.; Swamy, Geeta K.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 59, 01.01.2014, p. S404-S414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beigi, RH, Fortner, K, Munoz, FM, Roberts, J, Gordon, JL, Han, HH, Glenn, G, Dormitzer, PR, Gu, XX, Read, JS, Edwards, K, Patel, SM & Swamy, GK 2014, 'Maternal immunization: Opportunities for scientific advancement', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 59, pp. S404-S414. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciu708
Beigi, Richard H. ; Fortner, Kimberly ; Munoz, Flor M. ; Roberts, Jeff ; Gordon, Jennifer L. ; Han, Htay Htay ; Glenn, Greg ; Dormitzer, Philip R. ; Gu, Xing Xing ; Read, Jennifer S. ; Edwards, Kathryn ; Patel, Shital M. ; Swamy, Geeta K. / Maternal immunization : Opportunities for scientific advancement. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 59. pp. S404-S414.
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