Mechanical characteristics of lyophilized human saphenous vein valves

T. R. Reeves, J. L. Cezeaux, J. E. Sackman, D. C. Cassada, Michael Freeman, Scott Stevens, Mitchell Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We investigated the mechanical characteristics of lyophilized human saphenous vein valves to determine their suitability for use as allogeneic transplants to treat chronic venous insufficiency. Methods: Fresh cadaveric veins were lyophilized in vacuum bottles within 24 hours of harvest and were stored at room temperature. The veins were reconstituted in saline solution and then were placed in an in vitro flow circuit for evaluation. At varied flow rates, pressures proximal and distal to valves during prograde and retrograde flow were measured. Valve closure times were determined with Doppler examination and spectral analysis. The valves were also stressed to 350 mm Hg on a separate apparatus. Results: All pressures proximal and distal to the valves remained less than 10 mm Hg during prograde flow. A pressure gradient developed immediately on the reversal of flow. Pressure as high as 200 mm Hg applied against the closed valves was not transmitted beyond the valve. Valve closure times had a mean of 0.31 ± 0.03 seconds and 0.21 ± 0.01 seconds for the Doppler examination and spectral analysis, respectively. All valves withstood stress pressures to 350 mm Hg. Conclusions: The in vitro mechanical characteristics of the valves of lyophilized veins are similar to known values for normal in vivo valves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)823-828
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Saphenous Vein
Pressure
Veins
Venous Insufficiency
Vacuum
Sodium Chloride
Reference Values
Transplants
Temperature
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Mechanical characteristics of lyophilized human saphenous vein valves. / Reeves, T. R.; Cezeaux, J. L.; Sackman, J. E.; Cassada, D. C.; Freeman, Michael; Stevens, Scott; Goldman, Mitchell.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 26, No. 5, 01.01.1997, p. 823-828.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reeves, T. R. ; Cezeaux, J. L. ; Sackman, J. E. ; Cassada, D. C. ; Freeman, Michael ; Stevens, Scott ; Goldman, Mitchell. / Mechanical characteristics of lyophilized human saphenous vein valves. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1997 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 823-828.
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AU - Stevens, Scott

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