Mechanical, morphological and biochemical adaptations of bone and muscle to hindlimb suspension and exercise

Stephen R. Shaw, Ronald F. Zernicke, Arthur C. Vailas, Diane DeLuna, Donald Thomason, Kenneth M. Baldwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influences of weightbearing forces on the structural remodeling, matrix biochemistry, and mechanical characteristics of the rat tibia and femur and surrounding musculature were examined by means of a hindlimb suspension protocol and highly intensive treadmil running. Female, young adult, Sprague-Dawley rats were designated as either normal control, sedentary suspended, or exercise suspended rats. For 4 weeks, sedentary suspended rats were deprived of hindlimb-to-ground contact forces, while the exercise suspended rats experienced hindlimb ground reaction forces only during daily intensive treadmill training sessions. The suspension produced generalized atrophy of hindlimb skeletal muscles, with greater atrophy occurring in predominantly slow-twitch extensors and adductors, as compared with the mixed fiber-type extensors and flexors. Region-specific cortical thinning and endosteal resorption in tibial and femoral diaphyses occurred in conjunction with decrements in bone mechanical properties. Tibial and femoral regional remodeling was related to both the absence of cyclic bending strains due to normal weightbearing forces and the decrease in forces applied to bone by antigravity muscles. To a moderate extent, the superimposed strenuous running counteracted muscular atrophy during the suspension, particularly in the predominantly slow-twitch extensor and adductor muscles. The exercise did not, however, mitigate changes in bone mechanical properties and cross-sectional morphologies, and in some cases exacerbated the changes. Suspension with or without exercise did not alter the normal concentrations of collagen, phosphorus, and calcium in either tibia or femur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-234
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hindlimb Suspension
Muscle
Rats
Bone
Hindlimb
Exercise
Bone and Bones
Muscles
Suspensions
Weight-Bearing
Thigh
Tibia
Running
Femur
Atrophy
Diaphyses
Muscular Atrophy
Mechanical properties
Exercise equipment
Biochemistry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Mechanical, morphological and biochemical adaptations of bone and muscle to hindlimb suspension and exercise. / Shaw, Stephen R.; Zernicke, Ronald F.; Vailas, Arthur C.; DeLuna, Diane; Thomason, Donald; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.01.1987, p. 225-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shaw, Stephen R. ; Zernicke, Ronald F. ; Vailas, Arthur C. ; DeLuna, Diane ; Thomason, Donald ; Baldwin, Kenneth M. / Mechanical, morphological and biochemical adaptations of bone and muscle to hindlimb suspension and exercise. In: Journal of Biomechanics. 1987 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 225-234.
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