Mechanical response of the left ventricle during AC induced hemodynamic collapse

Brent K. Hoffmeister, J. A. Sexton, B. S. Sheals, Amy Curry, R. A. Malkin

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Medical equipment can unintentionally allow the flow of small amounts of AC current through the patient causing hemodynamic collapse without fibrillation. This study examines the mechanical response of the left ventricle during AC induced hemodynamic collapse. Six dogs received 5 seconds of AC current stimulation ranging from 4-160 Hz and 10-1000 μA to the right ventricle. A quadripolar catheter was placed in the apex of the left ventricle to measure left ventricular volume. Short-axis ultrasound images were recorded to measure left ventricular cross sectional area and wall thickness. Our results showed that the mean volume of the left ventricle during collapse was significantly smaller (p < 0.05) than the mean volume preceding collapse. Cross sectional area also decreased significantly and wall thickness increased. This suggests that the heart assumes a contracted, systole-like state during collapse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-703
Number of pages3
JournalComputers in Cardiology
Volume29
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes
EventComputers in Cardiology 2002 - Memphis, TN, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2002Sep 25 2002

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Hemodynamics
Heart Ventricles
Biomedical equipment
Catheters
Ultrasonics
Systole
Dogs
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hoffmeister, B. K., Sexton, J. A., Sheals, B. S., Curry, A., & Malkin, R. A. (2002). Mechanical response of the left ventricle during AC induced hemodynamic collapse. Computers in Cardiology, 29, 701-703.

Mechanical response of the left ventricle during AC induced hemodynamic collapse. / Hoffmeister, Brent K.; Sexton, J. A.; Sheals, B. S.; Curry, Amy; Malkin, R. A.

In: Computers in Cardiology, Vol. 29, 01.12.2002, p. 701-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Hoffmeister, BK, Sexton, JA, Sheals, BS, Curry, A & Malkin, RA 2002, 'Mechanical response of the left ventricle during AC induced hemodynamic collapse', Computers in Cardiology, vol. 29, pp. 701-703.
Hoffmeister BK, Sexton JA, Sheals BS, Curry A, Malkin RA. Mechanical response of the left ventricle during AC induced hemodynamic collapse. Computers in Cardiology. 2002 Dec 1;29:701-703.
Hoffmeister, Brent K. ; Sexton, J. A. ; Sheals, B. S. ; Curry, Amy ; Malkin, R. A. / Mechanical response of the left ventricle during AC induced hemodynamic collapse. In: Computers in Cardiology. 2002 ; Vol. 29. pp. 701-703.
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