Mechanisms and therapeutic applications of immune stimulatory CpG DNA

Arthur M. Krieg, Ae-Kyung Yi, Gunther Hartmann

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aside from its function as the 'blueprint of life' that encodes genetic information, DNA can have direct immune activities. The immune system has evolved a defense mechanism that is able to distinguish microbial DNA from our own because of differences in the frequency and methylation of CpG dinucleotides in particular base contexts. Within minutes of detecting such 'CpG-S DNA,' cells of the innate immune system become activated and produce cytokines that promote the generation of antigen specific T-helper-1-like immune responses. Animal studies indicate therapeutic utility for CpG-S DNA as a vaccine adjuvant and for the immunotherapy of cancer and infectious and allergic diseases. Published by Elsevier Science Inc. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-120
Number of pages8
JournalPharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

DNA
Immune System
Viral Tumor Antigens
Therapeutics
Immunotherapy
Methylation
Communicable Diseases
Vaccines
Cytokines
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Mechanisms and therapeutic applications of immune stimulatory CpG DNA. / Krieg, Arthur M.; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Hartmann, Gunther.

In: Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 84, No. 2, 01.11.1999, p. 113-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Krieg, Arthur M. ; Yi, Ae-Kyung ; Hartmann, Gunther. / Mechanisms and therapeutic applications of immune stimulatory CpG DNA. In: Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 1999 ; Vol. 84, No. 2. pp. 113-120.
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