Mechanisms of action of antifungal agents

Stephanie A. Flowers, Phillip Rogers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

There are currently only four structurally distinct antifungal classes available for the treatment of invasive fungal infections. As both fungal cells and mammalian cells are eukaryotic, anti-infective drug targets that are fungal specific are few. The most widely exploited strategy for antifungal therapy makes use of differences in sterol biosynthesis and targets either the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway or ergosterol itself, which is incorporated into the fungal cell membrane. Other strategies include inhibiting RNA and DNA synthesis by compounds that are selectively transported into the fungal cell and inhibition of the fungal cell wall. Mortality rates in neutropenic patients for yeast and mold infections are still unacceptably high, and time to implementation of the optimal antifungal has a significant impact on patient outcomes (Garey et al. 2006).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPractical Handbook of Microbiology, Third Edition
PublisherCRC Press
Pages183-196
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781466587403
ISBN (Print)9781466587397
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Ergosterol
Antifungal Agents
Biosynthesis
Cells
Eukaryotic Cells
Sterols
Cell membranes
Yeast
Cell Wall
Fungi
mortality
Yeasts
Cell Membrane
RNA
drug
Mortality
DNA
Therapeutics
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Flowers, S. A., & Rogers, P. (2015). Mechanisms of action of antifungal agents. In Practical Handbook of Microbiology, Third Edition (pp. 183-196). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b17871

Mechanisms of action of antifungal agents. / Flowers, Stephanie A.; Rogers, Phillip.

Practical Handbook of Microbiology, Third Edition. CRC Press, 2015. p. 183-196.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Flowers, SA & Rogers, P 2015, Mechanisms of action of antifungal agents. in Practical Handbook of Microbiology, Third Edition. CRC Press, pp. 183-196. https://doi.org/10.1201/b17871
Flowers SA, Rogers P. Mechanisms of action of antifungal agents. In Practical Handbook of Microbiology, Third Edition. CRC Press. 2015. p. 183-196 https://doi.org/10.1201/b17871
Flowers, Stephanie A. ; Rogers, Phillip. / Mechanisms of action of antifungal agents. Practical Handbook of Microbiology, Third Edition. CRC Press, 2015. pp. 183-196
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