Medical school attended as a predictor of medical malpractice claims

Teresa Waters, F. V. Lefevre, P. P. Budetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Following earlier research which showed that certain types of physicians are more likely to be sued for malpractice, this study explored (1) whether graduates of certain medical schools have consistently higher rates of lawsuits against them, (2) if the rates of lawsuits against physicians are associated with their school of graduation, and (3) whether the characteristics of the medical school explain any differences found. Design: Retrospective analysis of malpractice claims data from three states merged with physician data from the AMA Masterfile (n=30 288). Study subjects: All US medical schools with at least 5% of graduates practising in three study states (n=89). Main outcome measures: Proportion of graduates from a medical school for a particular decade sued for medical malpractice between 1990 and 1997 and odds ratio for lawsuits against physicians from high and low outlier schools; correlations between the lawsuit rates of successive cohorts of graduates of specific medical schools. Results: Medical schools that are outliers for malpractice lawsuits against their graduates in one decade are likely to retain their outlier status in the subsequent decade. In addition, outlier status of a physician's medical schaal in the decade before his or her graduation is predictive of that physician's malpractice claims experience (p<0.01). All correlations of cahorts were relatively high and all were statistically significant at p<0.001. Comparison of outlier and nan-outlier schools showed that some differences exist in school ownership (p<0.05), years since established (p<0.05), and mean number of residents and fellows (p<0.01). Conclusions: Consistent differences in malpractice experience exist among medical schools. Further research exploring alternative explanations for these differences needs to be conducted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-336
Number of pages7
JournalQuality and Safety in Health Care
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

Fingerprint

Malpractice
Medical Schools
Physicians
Insurance Claim Review
Ownership
Research
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Medical school attended as a predictor of medical malpractice claims. / Waters, Teresa; Lefevre, F. V.; Budetti, P. P.

In: Quality and Safety in Health Care, Vol. 12, No. 5, 01.10.2003, p. 330-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waters, Teresa ; Lefevre, F. V. ; Budetti, P. P. / Medical school attended as a predictor of medical malpractice claims. In: Quality and Safety in Health Care. 2003 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 330-336.
@article{3a6c25dd1cec4c7697110dc300d144b7,
title = "Medical school attended as a predictor of medical malpractice claims",
abstract = "Objectives: Following earlier research which showed that certain types of physicians are more likely to be sued for malpractice, this study explored (1) whether graduates of certain medical schools have consistently higher rates of lawsuits against them, (2) if the rates of lawsuits against physicians are associated with their school of graduation, and (3) whether the characteristics of the medical school explain any differences found. Design: Retrospective analysis of malpractice claims data from three states merged with physician data from the AMA Masterfile (n=30 288). Study subjects: All US medical schools with at least 5{\%} of graduates practising in three study states (n=89). Main outcome measures: Proportion of graduates from a medical school for a particular decade sued for medical malpractice between 1990 and 1997 and odds ratio for lawsuits against physicians from high and low outlier schools; correlations between the lawsuit rates of successive cohorts of graduates of specific medical schools. Results: Medical schools that are outliers for malpractice lawsuits against their graduates in one decade are likely to retain their outlier status in the subsequent decade. In addition, outlier status of a physician's medical schaal in the decade before his or her graduation is predictive of that physician's malpractice claims experience (p<0.01). All correlations of cahorts were relatively high and all were statistically significant at p<0.001. Comparison of outlier and nan-outlier schools showed that some differences exist in school ownership (p<0.05), years since established (p<0.05), and mean number of residents and fellows (p<0.01). Conclusions: Consistent differences in malpractice experience exist among medical schools. Further research exploring alternative explanations for these differences needs to be conducted.",
author = "Teresa Waters and Lefevre, {F. V.} and Budetti, {P. P.}",
year = "2003",
month = "10",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "330--336",
journal = "BMJ Quality and Safety",
issn = "2044-5415",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medical school attended as a predictor of medical malpractice claims

AU - Waters, Teresa

AU - Lefevre, F. V.

AU - Budetti, P. P.

PY - 2003/10/1

Y1 - 2003/10/1

N2 - Objectives: Following earlier research which showed that certain types of physicians are more likely to be sued for malpractice, this study explored (1) whether graduates of certain medical schools have consistently higher rates of lawsuits against them, (2) if the rates of lawsuits against physicians are associated with their school of graduation, and (3) whether the characteristics of the medical school explain any differences found. Design: Retrospective analysis of malpractice claims data from three states merged with physician data from the AMA Masterfile (n=30 288). Study subjects: All US medical schools with at least 5% of graduates practising in three study states (n=89). Main outcome measures: Proportion of graduates from a medical school for a particular decade sued for medical malpractice between 1990 and 1997 and odds ratio for lawsuits against physicians from high and low outlier schools; correlations between the lawsuit rates of successive cohorts of graduates of specific medical schools. Results: Medical schools that are outliers for malpractice lawsuits against their graduates in one decade are likely to retain their outlier status in the subsequent decade. In addition, outlier status of a physician's medical schaal in the decade before his or her graduation is predictive of that physician's malpractice claims experience (p<0.01). All correlations of cahorts were relatively high and all were statistically significant at p<0.001. Comparison of outlier and nan-outlier schools showed that some differences exist in school ownership (p<0.05), years since established (p<0.05), and mean number of residents and fellows (p<0.01). Conclusions: Consistent differences in malpractice experience exist among medical schools. Further research exploring alternative explanations for these differences needs to be conducted.

AB - Objectives: Following earlier research which showed that certain types of physicians are more likely to be sued for malpractice, this study explored (1) whether graduates of certain medical schools have consistently higher rates of lawsuits against them, (2) if the rates of lawsuits against physicians are associated with their school of graduation, and (3) whether the characteristics of the medical school explain any differences found. Design: Retrospective analysis of malpractice claims data from three states merged with physician data from the AMA Masterfile (n=30 288). Study subjects: All US medical schools with at least 5% of graduates practising in three study states (n=89). Main outcome measures: Proportion of graduates from a medical school for a particular decade sued for medical malpractice between 1990 and 1997 and odds ratio for lawsuits against physicians from high and low outlier schools; correlations between the lawsuit rates of successive cohorts of graduates of specific medical schools. Results: Medical schools that are outliers for malpractice lawsuits against their graduates in one decade are likely to retain their outlier status in the subsequent decade. In addition, outlier status of a physician's medical schaal in the decade before his or her graduation is predictive of that physician's malpractice claims experience (p<0.01). All correlations of cahorts were relatively high and all were statistically significant at p<0.001. Comparison of outlier and nan-outlier schools showed that some differences exist in school ownership (p<0.05), years since established (p<0.05), and mean number of residents and fellows (p<0.01). Conclusions: Consistent differences in malpractice experience exist among medical schools. Further research exploring alternative explanations for these differences needs to be conducted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0142147177&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0142147177&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 330

EP - 336

JO - BMJ Quality and Safety

JF - BMJ Quality and Safety

SN - 2044-5415

IS - 5

ER -