Medication adherence in older renal transplant recipients

Cynthia L. Russell, Muammer Cetingok, Karen Q. Hamburger, Sarah Owens, Denise Thompson, Donna Hathaway, Rebecca P. Winsett, Vicki S. Conn, Richard Madsen, Lisa Sitler, Mark R. Wakefield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This project examined patterns, predictors, and outcomes of medication adherence in a convenience sample of 37 renal transplant recipients aged 55 years or older in a Mid-Southern U.S. facility using an exploratory, descriptive, longitudinal design. Electronic monitoring was conducted for 12 months using the Medication Event Monitoring System. An alarming 86% of the participants were nonadherent with medications. Four clusters of medication taking and timing patterns were identified with evening doses presenting particular challenges. Depression, self-efficacy, social support, and medication side effects did not predict medication adherence. There was no significant difference in medication adherence scores between those with and without infections. Medication adherence pattern data from electronic monitoring provides an opportunity for health care professionals to move away from blaming the patient by attempting to identify predictors for medication nonadherence. Medication dose taking and timing patterns could be explored with patients so that medication adherence interventions could target specific patient patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-112
Number of pages18
JournalClinical Nursing Research
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Medication Adherence
Kidney
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Transplant Recipients
Depression
Delivery of Health Care
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Russell, C. L., Cetingok, M., Hamburger, K. Q., Owens, S., Thompson, D., Hathaway, D., ... Wakefield, M. R. (2010). Medication adherence in older renal transplant recipients. Clinical Nursing Research, 19(2), 95-112. https://doi.org/10.1177/1054773810362039

Medication adherence in older renal transplant recipients. / Russell, Cynthia L.; Cetingok, Muammer; Hamburger, Karen Q.; Owens, Sarah; Thompson, Denise; Hathaway, Donna; Winsett, Rebecca P.; Conn, Vicki S.; Madsen, Richard; Sitler, Lisa; Wakefield, Mark R.

In: Clinical Nursing Research, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.05.2010, p. 95-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Russell, CL, Cetingok, M, Hamburger, KQ, Owens, S, Thompson, D, Hathaway, D, Winsett, RP, Conn, VS, Madsen, R, Sitler, L & Wakefield, MR 2010, 'Medication adherence in older renal transplant recipients', Clinical Nursing Research, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 95-112. https://doi.org/10.1177/1054773810362039
Russell CL, Cetingok M, Hamburger KQ, Owens S, Thompson D, Hathaway D et al. Medication adherence in older renal transplant recipients. Clinical Nursing Research. 2010 May 1;19(2):95-112. https://doi.org/10.1177/1054773810362039
Russell, Cynthia L. ; Cetingok, Muammer ; Hamburger, Karen Q. ; Owens, Sarah ; Thompson, Denise ; Hathaway, Donna ; Winsett, Rebecca P. ; Conn, Vicki S. ; Madsen, Richard ; Sitler, Lisa ; Wakefield, Mark R. / Medication adherence in older renal transplant recipients. In: Clinical Nursing Research. 2010 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 95-112.
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