Memory T cells are uniquely resistant to melanoma-induced suppression

Lucy Wentworth, Justin V. Meyers, Sheeba Alam, Andrew Russ, M. Suresh, Clifford S. Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously observed that in vivo exposure to growing melanoma tumors fundamentally alters activated T cell homeostasis by suppressing the ability of naïve T cells to undergo antigen-driven proliferative expansion. We hypothesized that exposure of T cells in later stages of differentiation to melanoma would have similar suppressive consequences. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with media or syngeneic B16F10 melanoma tumors 8 or 60 days after infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), and splenic populations of LCMV-specific T cells were quantified using flow cytometry 18 days after tumor inoculation. Inoculation with melanoma on post-infection day 8 potentiated the contraction of previously activated T cells. This enhanced contraction was associated with increased apoptotic susceptibility among T cells from tumor-bearing mice. In contrast, inoculation with melanoma on post-infection day 60 did not affect the ability of previously established memory T cells to maintain themselves in stable numbers. In addition, the ability of previously established memory T cells to respond to LCMV challenge was unaffected by melanoma. Following adoptive transfer into melanoma-bearing mice, tumor-specific memory T cells were significantly more effective at controlling melanoma growth than equivalent numbers of tumor-specific effector T cells. These observations suggest that memory T cells are uniquely resistant to suppressive influences exerted by melanoma on activated T cell homeostasis; these findings may have implications for T cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-159
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Immunology, Immunotherapy
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Melanoma
T-Lymphocytes
Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus
Neoplasms
Homeostasis
Infection
Adoptive Transfer
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Immunotherapy
Flow Cytometry
Antigens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Memory T cells are uniquely resistant to melanoma-induced suppression. / Wentworth, Lucy; Meyers, Justin V.; Alam, Sheeba; Russ, Andrew; Suresh, M.; Cho, Clifford S.

In: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, Vol. 62, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 149-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wentworth, Lucy ; Meyers, Justin V. ; Alam, Sheeba ; Russ, Andrew ; Suresh, M. ; Cho, Clifford S. / Memory T cells are uniquely resistant to melanoma-induced suppression. In: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy. 2013 ; Vol. 62, No. 1. pp. 149-159.
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