Metabolic heat production as a measure of macrophage response to particles from orthopedic implant materials

S. J. Charlebois, A. U. Daniels, Richard Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An in vitro method to gauge metabolic heat response of macrophages (MØ) to particulates is described. Whereas the majority of work cited relies on chemical analysis to assess MØ response to particles, we have used isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) for direct continuous measurement of metabolic heat production to gauge the response. IMC is a screening method, in that it ensures that no energy-consuming phagocytic response goes undetected, and that the aggregate metabolic magnitude of the responses is determined. A four-well IMC was used in all microcalorimetric measurements. To accommodate "zero-time" monitoring of the interaction of particles and cells, a set of identical test chambers was constructed for use in the IMC. MØs were injected from outside the IMC onto particles contained in collagen or gelatin on glass coverslips at the bottom of each chamber. IMC runs were performed using MØs only, MØs and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) positive control, and MØs and clean or LPS-bound particles of either high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr). Total heat produced by the negative controls (MØs alone) was lower than for MØ exposure to LPS or particles. The trend was a higher response for LPS-bound HDPE compared with clean HDPE particles, though not significant. In conclusion, our results have shown that IMC can be used to detect the heat associated with the phagocytosis of particulate materials by MØs in vitro.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-175
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Macrophages
Orthopedics
High density polyethylenes
Lipopolysaccharides
Polyethylene
Gages
Collagen
Enthalpy
Cobalt
Screening
Gelatin
Glass
Monitoring
Chemical analysis
Hot Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Metabolic heat production as a measure of macrophage response to particles from orthopedic implant materials. / Charlebois, S. J.; Daniels, A. U.; Smith, Richard.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Vol. 59, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 166-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7687f5c75ad14258a4cfea26ecaecf5a,
title = "Metabolic heat production as a measure of macrophage response to particles from orthopedic implant materials",
abstract = "An in vitro method to gauge metabolic heat response of macrophages (M{\O}) to particulates is described. Whereas the majority of work cited relies on chemical analysis to assess M{\O} response to particles, we have used isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) for direct continuous measurement of metabolic heat production to gauge the response. IMC is a screening method, in that it ensures that no energy-consuming phagocytic response goes undetected, and that the aggregate metabolic magnitude of the responses is determined. A four-well IMC was used in all microcalorimetric measurements. To accommodate {"}zero-time{"} monitoring of the interaction of particles and cells, a set of identical test chambers was constructed for use in the IMC. M{\O}s were injected from outside the IMC onto particles contained in collagen or gelatin on glass coverslips at the bottom of each chamber. IMC runs were performed using M{\O}s only, M{\O}s and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) positive control, and M{\O}s and clean or LPS-bound particles of either high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr). Total heat produced by the negative controls (M{\O}s alone) was lower than for M{\O} exposure to LPS or particles. The trend was a higher response for LPS-bound HDPE compared with clean HDPE particles, though not significant. In conclusion, our results have shown that IMC can be used to detect the heat associated with the phagocytosis of particulate materials by M{\O}s in vitro.",
author = "Charlebois, {S. J.} and Daniels, {A. U.} and Richard Smith",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jbm.1230",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "166--175",
journal = "Journal of Biomedical Materials Research",
issn = "1552-4973",
publisher = "Heterocorporation",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic heat production as a measure of macrophage response to particles from orthopedic implant materials

AU - Charlebois, S. J.

AU - Daniels, A. U.

AU - Smith, Richard

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - An in vitro method to gauge metabolic heat response of macrophages (MØ) to particulates is described. Whereas the majority of work cited relies on chemical analysis to assess MØ response to particles, we have used isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) for direct continuous measurement of metabolic heat production to gauge the response. IMC is a screening method, in that it ensures that no energy-consuming phagocytic response goes undetected, and that the aggregate metabolic magnitude of the responses is determined. A four-well IMC was used in all microcalorimetric measurements. To accommodate "zero-time" monitoring of the interaction of particles and cells, a set of identical test chambers was constructed for use in the IMC. MØs were injected from outside the IMC onto particles contained in collagen or gelatin on glass coverslips at the bottom of each chamber. IMC runs were performed using MØs only, MØs and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) positive control, and MØs and clean or LPS-bound particles of either high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr). Total heat produced by the negative controls (MØs alone) was lower than for MØ exposure to LPS or particles. The trend was a higher response for LPS-bound HDPE compared with clean HDPE particles, though not significant. In conclusion, our results have shown that IMC can be used to detect the heat associated with the phagocytosis of particulate materials by MØs in vitro.

AB - An in vitro method to gauge metabolic heat response of macrophages (MØ) to particulates is described. Whereas the majority of work cited relies on chemical analysis to assess MØ response to particles, we have used isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) for direct continuous measurement of metabolic heat production to gauge the response. IMC is a screening method, in that it ensures that no energy-consuming phagocytic response goes undetected, and that the aggregate metabolic magnitude of the responses is determined. A four-well IMC was used in all microcalorimetric measurements. To accommodate "zero-time" monitoring of the interaction of particles and cells, a set of identical test chambers was constructed for use in the IMC. MØs were injected from outside the IMC onto particles contained in collagen or gelatin on glass coverslips at the bottom of each chamber. IMC runs were performed using MØs only, MØs and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) positive control, and MØs and clean or LPS-bound particles of either high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr). Total heat produced by the negative controls (MØs alone) was lower than for MØ exposure to LPS or particles. The trend was a higher response for LPS-bound HDPE compared with clean HDPE particles, though not significant. In conclusion, our results have shown that IMC can be used to detect the heat associated with the phagocytosis of particulate materials by MØs in vitro.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036133111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036133111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jbm.1230

DO - 10.1002/jbm.1230

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 166

EP - 175

JO - Journal of Biomedical Materials Research

JF - Journal of Biomedical Materials Research

SN - 1552-4973

IS - 1

ER -