Metabolic profiles of obesity in American Indians

The strong heart family study

Qi Zhao, Yun Zhu, Lyle G. Best, Jason G. Umans, Karan Uppal, Vi Linh T. Tran, Dean P. Jones, Elisa T. Lee, Barbara V. Howard, Jinying Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is a typical metabolic disorder resulting from the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. American Indians suffer disproportionately high rates of obesity and diabetes. The goal of this study is to identify metabolic profiles of obesity in 431 normoglycemic American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we detected 1,364 distinct m/z features matched to known compounds in the current metabolomics databases. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify metabolic profiles for obesity, adjusting for standard obesity indicators. After adjusting for covariates and multiple testing, five metabolites were associated with body mass index and seven were associated with waist circumference. Of them, three were associated with both. Majority of the obesity-related metabolites belongs to lipids, e.g., fatty amides, sphingolipids, prenol lipids, and steroid derivatives. Other identified metabolites are amino acids or peptides. Of the nine identified metabolites, five metabolites (oleoylethanolamide, mannosyl-diinositol-phosphorylceramide, pristanic acid, glutamate, and kynurenine) have been previously implicated in obesity or its related pathways. Future studies are warranted to replicate these findings in larger populations or other ethnic groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0159548
JournalPloS one
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

family studies
Metabolome
North American Indians
American Indians
Metabolites
obesity
Obesity
heart
metabolites
Kynurenine
Lipids
Sphingolipids
Liquid chromatography
Medical problems
kynurenine
Amides
Mass spectrometry
sphingolipids
Glutamic Acid
Metabolomics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Zhao, Q., Zhu, Y., Best, L. G., Umans, J. G., Uppal, K., Tran, V. L. T., ... Zhao, J. (2016). Metabolic profiles of obesity in American Indians: The strong heart family study. PloS one, 11(7), [e0159548]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159548

Metabolic profiles of obesity in American Indians : The strong heart family study. / Zhao, Qi; Zhu, Yun; Best, Lyle G.; Umans, Jason G.; Uppal, Karan; Tran, Vi Linh T.; Jones, Dean P.; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Zhao, Jinying.

In: PloS one, Vol. 11, No. 7, e0159548, 01.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhao, Q, Zhu, Y, Best, LG, Umans, JG, Uppal, K, Tran, VLT, Jones, DP, Lee, ET, Howard, BV & Zhao, J 2016, 'Metabolic profiles of obesity in American Indians: The strong heart family study', PloS one, vol. 11, no. 7, e0159548. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159548
Zhao, Qi ; Zhu, Yun ; Best, Lyle G. ; Umans, Jason G. ; Uppal, Karan ; Tran, Vi Linh T. ; Jones, Dean P. ; Lee, Elisa T. ; Howard, Barbara V. ; Zhao, Jinying. / Metabolic profiles of obesity in American Indians : The strong heart family study. In: PloS one. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 7.
@article{ccb2025c61f64c69a840dffda14f31ee,
title = "Metabolic profiles of obesity in American Indians: The strong heart family study",
abstract = "Obesity is a typical metabolic disorder resulting from the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. American Indians suffer disproportionately high rates of obesity and diabetes. The goal of this study is to identify metabolic profiles of obesity in 431 normoglycemic American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we detected 1,364 distinct m/z features matched to known compounds in the current metabolomics databases. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify metabolic profiles for obesity, adjusting for standard obesity indicators. After adjusting for covariates and multiple testing, five metabolites were associated with body mass index and seven were associated with waist circumference. Of them, three were associated with both. Majority of the obesity-related metabolites belongs to lipids, e.g., fatty amides, sphingolipids, prenol lipids, and steroid derivatives. Other identified metabolites are amino acids or peptides. Of the nine identified metabolites, five metabolites (oleoylethanolamide, mannosyl-diinositol-phosphorylceramide, pristanic acid, glutamate, and kynurenine) have been previously implicated in obesity or its related pathways. Future studies are warranted to replicate these findings in larger populations or other ethnic groups.",
author = "Qi Zhao and Yun Zhu and Best, {Lyle G.} and Umans, {Jason G.} and Karan Uppal and Tran, {Vi Linh T.} and Jones, {Dean P.} and Lee, {Elisa T.} and Howard, {Barbara V.} and Jinying Zhao",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0159548",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic profiles of obesity in American Indians

T2 - The strong heart family study

AU - Zhao, Qi

AU - Zhu, Yun

AU - Best, Lyle G.

AU - Umans, Jason G.

AU - Uppal, Karan

AU - Tran, Vi Linh T.

AU - Jones, Dean P.

AU - Lee, Elisa T.

AU - Howard, Barbara V.

AU - Zhao, Jinying

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - Obesity is a typical metabolic disorder resulting from the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. American Indians suffer disproportionately high rates of obesity and diabetes. The goal of this study is to identify metabolic profiles of obesity in 431 normoglycemic American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we detected 1,364 distinct m/z features matched to known compounds in the current metabolomics databases. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify metabolic profiles for obesity, adjusting for standard obesity indicators. After adjusting for covariates and multiple testing, five metabolites were associated with body mass index and seven were associated with waist circumference. Of them, three were associated with both. Majority of the obesity-related metabolites belongs to lipids, e.g., fatty amides, sphingolipids, prenol lipids, and steroid derivatives. Other identified metabolites are amino acids or peptides. Of the nine identified metabolites, five metabolites (oleoylethanolamide, mannosyl-diinositol-phosphorylceramide, pristanic acid, glutamate, and kynurenine) have been previously implicated in obesity or its related pathways. Future studies are warranted to replicate these findings in larger populations or other ethnic groups.

AB - Obesity is a typical metabolic disorder resulting from the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. American Indians suffer disproportionately high rates of obesity and diabetes. The goal of this study is to identify metabolic profiles of obesity in 431 normoglycemic American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we detected 1,364 distinct m/z features matched to known compounds in the current metabolomics databases. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify metabolic profiles for obesity, adjusting for standard obesity indicators. After adjusting for covariates and multiple testing, five metabolites were associated with body mass index and seven were associated with waist circumference. Of them, three were associated with both. Majority of the obesity-related metabolites belongs to lipids, e.g., fatty amides, sphingolipids, prenol lipids, and steroid derivatives. Other identified metabolites are amino acids or peptides. Of the nine identified metabolites, five metabolites (oleoylethanolamide, mannosyl-diinositol-phosphorylceramide, pristanic acid, glutamate, and kynurenine) have been previously implicated in obesity or its related pathways. Future studies are warranted to replicate these findings in larger populations or other ethnic groups.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84979524688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84979524688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0159548

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0159548

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e0159548

ER -