Metallothionein and liver cell regeneration

M. George Cherian, Yujian Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatocytes in adults are in a nonproliferative state but they have high capacity to regenerate within few hours after an injury. After partial hepatectomy or chemical injury, hepatocytes undergo a synchronized multistep process consisting of priming/initiation, proliferation, and termination. These distinct steps are essential for restoring the structure and functions of liver. The mechanisms involved in each of these steps of regeneration are well documented from various laboratories and are described in several reviews. We briefly describe these steps and the involvement of various cytokines and growth factors for cell regeneration in this short review. Liver cell regeneration may also involve stem cell proliferation. The regenerating cells require large amounts of zinc within a short time, and this requirement is met by induction of a zinc and copper binding protein, metallothionein (MT), during the priming step, soon after an injury. There are several reports on the transfer of zinc from MT to various metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Genetically modified mouse models have been used to study the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in cell regeneration. The use of an MT-knockout mouse has enabled us to investigate the specific role of MT in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, chemical injury, and fibrosis. Several studies have suggested a defective liver regeneration after an injury in MT-knockout mice. There is cumulative evidence that indicates an essential role for MT in liver cell regeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-144
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Biology and Medicine
Volume231
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Liver Regeneration
Metallothionein
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Regeneration
Hepatectomy
Knockout Mice
Hepatocytes
Cell proliferation
Stem cells
Zinc
Interleukin-6
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Fibrosis
Transcription Factors
Stem Cells
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Cell Proliferation
Cytokines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Metallothionein and liver cell regeneration. / Cherian, M. George; Kang, Yujian.

In: Experimental Biology and Medicine, Vol. 231, No. 2, 01.01.2006, p. 138-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

Cherian, M. George ; Kang, Yujian. / Metallothionein and liver cell regeneration. In: Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 231, No. 2. pp. 138-144.
@article{5db5e93a5b6740b48f3e4de897041744,
title = "Metallothionein and liver cell regeneration",
abstract = "Hepatocytes in adults are in a nonproliferative state but they have high capacity to regenerate within few hours after an injury. After partial hepatectomy or chemical injury, hepatocytes undergo a synchronized multistep process consisting of priming/initiation, proliferation, and termination. These distinct steps are essential for restoring the structure and functions of liver. The mechanisms involved in each of these steps of regeneration are well documented from various laboratories and are described in several reviews. We briefly describe these steps and the involvement of various cytokines and growth factors for cell regeneration in this short review. Liver cell regeneration may also involve stem cell proliferation. The regenerating cells require large amounts of zinc within a short time, and this requirement is met by induction of a zinc and copper binding protein, metallothionein (MT), during the priming step, soon after an injury. There are several reports on the transfer of zinc from MT to various metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Genetically modified mouse models have been used to study the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in cell regeneration. The use of an MT-knockout mouse has enabled us to investigate the specific role of MT in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, chemical injury, and fibrosis. Several studies have suggested a defective liver regeneration after an injury in MT-knockout mice. There is cumulative evidence that indicates an essential role for MT in liver cell regeneration.",
author = "Cherian, {M. George} and Yujian Kang",
year = "2006",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/153537020623100203",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "231",
pages = "138--144",
journal = "Experimental Biology and Medicine",
issn = "1535-3702",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metallothionein and liver cell regeneration

AU - Cherian, M. George

AU - Kang, Yujian

PY - 2006/1/1

Y1 - 2006/1/1

N2 - Hepatocytes in adults are in a nonproliferative state but they have high capacity to regenerate within few hours after an injury. After partial hepatectomy or chemical injury, hepatocytes undergo a synchronized multistep process consisting of priming/initiation, proliferation, and termination. These distinct steps are essential for restoring the structure and functions of liver. The mechanisms involved in each of these steps of regeneration are well documented from various laboratories and are described in several reviews. We briefly describe these steps and the involvement of various cytokines and growth factors for cell regeneration in this short review. Liver cell regeneration may also involve stem cell proliferation. The regenerating cells require large amounts of zinc within a short time, and this requirement is met by induction of a zinc and copper binding protein, metallothionein (MT), during the priming step, soon after an injury. There are several reports on the transfer of zinc from MT to various metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Genetically modified mouse models have been used to study the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in cell regeneration. The use of an MT-knockout mouse has enabled us to investigate the specific role of MT in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, chemical injury, and fibrosis. Several studies have suggested a defective liver regeneration after an injury in MT-knockout mice. There is cumulative evidence that indicates an essential role for MT in liver cell regeneration.

AB - Hepatocytes in adults are in a nonproliferative state but they have high capacity to regenerate within few hours after an injury. After partial hepatectomy or chemical injury, hepatocytes undergo a synchronized multistep process consisting of priming/initiation, proliferation, and termination. These distinct steps are essential for restoring the structure and functions of liver. The mechanisms involved in each of these steps of regeneration are well documented from various laboratories and are described in several reviews. We briefly describe these steps and the involvement of various cytokines and growth factors for cell regeneration in this short review. Liver cell regeneration may also involve stem cell proliferation. The regenerating cells require large amounts of zinc within a short time, and this requirement is met by induction of a zinc and copper binding protein, metallothionein (MT), during the priming step, soon after an injury. There are several reports on the transfer of zinc from MT to various metalloenzymes and transcription factors. Genetically modified mouse models have been used to study the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in cell regeneration. The use of an MT-knockout mouse has enabled us to investigate the specific role of MT in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, chemical injury, and fibrosis. Several studies have suggested a defective liver regeneration after an injury in MT-knockout mice. There is cumulative evidence that indicates an essential role for MT in liver cell regeneration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=32244433433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=32244433433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/153537020623100203

DO - 10.1177/153537020623100203

M3 - Short survey

VL - 231

SP - 138

EP - 144

JO - Experimental Biology and Medicine

JF - Experimental Biology and Medicine

SN - 1535-3702

IS - 2

ER -