Metastatic melanoma of the uterine cervix diagnosed on cervical Pap smear

Case report and literature review

Tracy R. Shachner, Stuart Van Meter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Metastatic cancer involving the uterine cervix is exceedingly rare, and accounts for less than 1% of cancer deaths. The cervix is an uncommon location for metastatic lesions due to its limited blood supply and fibrous stroma and metastatic melanoma of the cervix is particularly infrequent. To the best of our knowledge and literature review, there have only been nine reported cases in the literature of metastatic melanoma involving the uterine cervix that were diagnosed via cervicovaginal Pap smears, including the case being reported in this paper. Diagnosing metastatic melanoma on cervicovaginal cytology specimens is challenging, not only because of its rarity, but also because of the inherent ability of melanoma to take on many different cytomorphologic appearances. In such cases, the differential diagnosis may include a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, atypical glandular cells, adenocarcinoma and other poorly differentiated malignancies. We report a case of malignant melanoma to the cervix diagnosed by a routine cervical Pap smear in a young woman who was diagnosed with cutaneous melanoma 3 years prior. Because of the diagnosis rendered on her cervical Pap smear, she was subsequently found to have widespread metastatic disease. Although the cervical Pap smear is primarily intended to screen for squamous intraepithelial lesions, a high index of suspicion must be maintained for other less common entities, particularly when there is no evidence of a squamous intraepithelial lesion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1045-1049
Number of pages5
JournalDiagnostic Cytopathology
Volume46
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Papanicolaou Test
Vaginal Smears
Cervix Uteri
Melanoma
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Cell Biology
Neoplasms
Adenocarcinoma
Differential Diagnosis
Skin
Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Cervix

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Histology

Cite this

Metastatic melanoma of the uterine cervix diagnosed on cervical Pap smear : Case report and literature review. / Shachner, Tracy R.; Van Meter, Stuart.

In: Diagnostic Cytopathology, Vol. 46, No. 12, 01.12.2018, p. 1045-1049.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{e3d7202792224bf19406c18ea9c653d5,
title = "Metastatic melanoma of the uterine cervix diagnosed on cervical Pap smear: Case report and literature review",
abstract = "Metastatic cancer involving the uterine cervix is exceedingly rare, and accounts for less than 1{\%} of cancer deaths. The cervix is an uncommon location for metastatic lesions due to its limited blood supply and fibrous stroma and metastatic melanoma of the cervix is particularly infrequent. To the best of our knowledge and literature review, there have only been nine reported cases in the literature of metastatic melanoma involving the uterine cervix that were diagnosed via cervicovaginal Pap smears, including the case being reported in this paper. Diagnosing metastatic melanoma on cervicovaginal cytology specimens is challenging, not only because of its rarity, but also because of the inherent ability of melanoma to take on many different cytomorphologic appearances. In such cases, the differential diagnosis may include a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, atypical glandular cells, adenocarcinoma and other poorly differentiated malignancies. We report a case of malignant melanoma to the cervix diagnosed by a routine cervical Pap smear in a young woman who was diagnosed with cutaneous melanoma 3 years prior. Because of the diagnosis rendered on her cervical Pap smear, she was subsequently found to have widespread metastatic disease. Although the cervical Pap smear is primarily intended to screen for squamous intraepithelial lesions, a high index of suspicion must be maintained for other less common entities, particularly when there is no evidence of a squamous intraepithelial lesion.",
author = "Shachner, {Tracy R.} and {Van Meter}, Stuart",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/dc.24058",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "1045--1049",
journal = "Diagnostic Cytopathology",
issn = "8755-1039",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metastatic melanoma of the uterine cervix diagnosed on cervical Pap smear

T2 - Case report and literature review

AU - Shachner, Tracy R.

AU - Van Meter, Stuart

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Metastatic cancer involving the uterine cervix is exceedingly rare, and accounts for less than 1% of cancer deaths. The cervix is an uncommon location for metastatic lesions due to its limited blood supply and fibrous stroma and metastatic melanoma of the cervix is particularly infrequent. To the best of our knowledge and literature review, there have only been nine reported cases in the literature of metastatic melanoma involving the uterine cervix that were diagnosed via cervicovaginal Pap smears, including the case being reported in this paper. Diagnosing metastatic melanoma on cervicovaginal cytology specimens is challenging, not only because of its rarity, but also because of the inherent ability of melanoma to take on many different cytomorphologic appearances. In such cases, the differential diagnosis may include a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, atypical glandular cells, adenocarcinoma and other poorly differentiated malignancies. We report a case of malignant melanoma to the cervix diagnosed by a routine cervical Pap smear in a young woman who was diagnosed with cutaneous melanoma 3 years prior. Because of the diagnosis rendered on her cervical Pap smear, she was subsequently found to have widespread metastatic disease. Although the cervical Pap smear is primarily intended to screen for squamous intraepithelial lesions, a high index of suspicion must be maintained for other less common entities, particularly when there is no evidence of a squamous intraepithelial lesion.

AB - Metastatic cancer involving the uterine cervix is exceedingly rare, and accounts for less than 1% of cancer deaths. The cervix is an uncommon location for metastatic lesions due to its limited blood supply and fibrous stroma and metastatic melanoma of the cervix is particularly infrequent. To the best of our knowledge and literature review, there have only been nine reported cases in the literature of metastatic melanoma involving the uterine cervix that were diagnosed via cervicovaginal Pap smears, including the case being reported in this paper. Diagnosing metastatic melanoma on cervicovaginal cytology specimens is challenging, not only because of its rarity, but also because of the inherent ability of melanoma to take on many different cytomorphologic appearances. In such cases, the differential diagnosis may include a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, atypical glandular cells, adenocarcinoma and other poorly differentiated malignancies. We report a case of malignant melanoma to the cervix diagnosed by a routine cervical Pap smear in a young woman who was diagnosed with cutaneous melanoma 3 years prior. Because of the diagnosis rendered on her cervical Pap smear, she was subsequently found to have widespread metastatic disease. Although the cervical Pap smear is primarily intended to screen for squamous intraepithelial lesions, a high index of suspicion must be maintained for other less common entities, particularly when there is no evidence of a squamous intraepithelial lesion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055474006&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85055474006&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/dc.24058

DO - 10.1002/dc.24058

M3 - Review article

VL - 46

SP - 1045

EP - 1049

JO - Diagnostic Cytopathology

JF - Diagnostic Cytopathology

SN - 8755-1039

IS - 12

ER -