Metastatic spinal cord compression

Meic H. Schmidt, Paul Klimo, Frank D. Vrionis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximately 70% of cancer patients have metastatic disease at death. The spine is involved in up to 40% of those patients. Spinal cord compression may develop in 5% to 10% of cancer patients and up to 40% of patients with preexisting nonspinal bone metastasis (>25,000 cases/y). Given the increasing survival times of patients with cancer, greater numbers of patients are likely to develop this complication. The role of surgery in the management of metastatic spinal cord compression is expanding. The management of metastatic spine disease can consist of a combination of surgery, radiation treatment, and chemotherapy. Treatment modalities are not mutually exclusive and must be individualized for patients evaluated in a multidisciplinary setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)711-719
Number of pages9
JournalJNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Spinal Cord Compression
Spine
Neoplasms
Radiation
Neoplasm Metastasis
Bone and Bones
Drug Therapy
Survival
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

Metastatic spinal cord compression. / Schmidt, Meic H.; Klimo, Paul; Vrionis, Frank D.

In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Vol. 3, No. 5, 01.01.2005, p. 711-719.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmidt, Meic H. ; Klimo, Paul ; Vrionis, Frank D. / Metastatic spinal cord compression. In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. 2005 ; Vol. 3, No. 5. pp. 711-719.
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