Methamphetamine cytotoxicity and effect on LPS-stimulated IL-1β production by human monocytes

David Tipton, Z. T. Legan, M. Kh Dabbous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is associated with "METH mouth", characterized by rampant dental decay and destruction of periodontal bone and soft tissues. In periodontitis, monocyte/macrophages, stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), produce interleukin-1β (IL-1β), contributing to bone and soft tissue degradation. Effects of METH on monocyte/macrophages and its role in periodontitis are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine METH cytotoxicity and effects on constitutive and LPS-stimulated IL-1β production in THP-1 human monocytes. METH significantly reduced cell viability, assessed by activity of a mitochondrial enzyme, by 20-40% after 24 h, with recovery at longer periods. Brief exposure to METH caused <10% cytotoxicity (measured by an assay that detects membrane damage). LPS from E. coli or the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. n.) significantly increased IL-1β production (measured by ELISA). Despite cytotoxicity of some METH concentrations, METH had no significant effect on constitutive IL-1β production. However, METH generally increased LPS-stimulated IL-1β levels, reaching statistical significance at 5 × 10-5 M METH (∼50% to >100% increase). The study suggests that METH potentiation of periodontopathogen LPS stimulation of IL-1β in monocytes could contribute to periodontitis in METH abusers, consistent with other studies suggesting a role for increased IL-1β in deleterious effects of METH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)921-927
Number of pages7
JournalToxicology in Vitro
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Cytotoxicity
Interleukin-1
Lipopolysaccharides
Monocytes
Periodontitis
Macrophages
Bone
Tissue
Bone and Bones
Dental Caries
Mouth
Cell Survival
Cells
Recovery
Degradation
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Methamphetamine cytotoxicity and effect on LPS-stimulated IL-1β production by human monocytes. / Tipton, David; Legan, Z. T.; Dabbous, M. Kh.

In: Toxicology in Vitro, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.04.2010, p. 921-927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{33e9781e05bd4e38bf1e53d4104c362c,
title = "Methamphetamine cytotoxicity and effect on LPS-stimulated IL-1β production by human monocytes",
abstract = "Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is associated with {"}METH mouth{"}, characterized by rampant dental decay and destruction of periodontal bone and soft tissues. In periodontitis, monocyte/macrophages, stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), produce interleukin-1β (IL-1β), contributing to bone and soft tissue degradation. Effects of METH on monocyte/macrophages and its role in periodontitis are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine METH cytotoxicity and effects on constitutive and LPS-stimulated IL-1β production in THP-1 human monocytes. METH significantly reduced cell viability, assessed by activity of a mitochondrial enzyme, by 20-40{\%} after 24 h, with recovery at longer periods. Brief exposure to METH caused <10{\%} cytotoxicity (measured by an assay that detects membrane damage). LPS from E. coli or the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. n.) significantly increased IL-1β production (measured by ELISA). Despite cytotoxicity of some METH concentrations, METH had no significant effect on constitutive IL-1β production. However, METH generally increased LPS-stimulated IL-1β levels, reaching statistical significance at 5 × 10-5 M METH (∼50{\%} to >100{\%} increase). The study suggests that METH potentiation of periodontopathogen LPS stimulation of IL-1β in monocytes could contribute to periodontitis in METH abusers, consistent with other studies suggesting a role for increased IL-1β in deleterious effects of METH.",
author = "David Tipton and Legan, {Z. T.} and Dabbous, {M. Kh}",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.tiv.2009.11.015",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "921--927",
journal = "Toxicology in Vitro",
issn = "0887-2333",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Methamphetamine cytotoxicity and effect on LPS-stimulated IL-1β production by human monocytes

AU - Tipton, David

AU - Legan, Z. T.

AU - Dabbous, M. Kh

PY - 2010/4/1

Y1 - 2010/4/1

N2 - Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is associated with "METH mouth", characterized by rampant dental decay and destruction of periodontal bone and soft tissues. In periodontitis, monocyte/macrophages, stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), produce interleukin-1β (IL-1β), contributing to bone and soft tissue degradation. Effects of METH on monocyte/macrophages and its role in periodontitis are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine METH cytotoxicity and effects on constitutive and LPS-stimulated IL-1β production in THP-1 human monocytes. METH significantly reduced cell viability, assessed by activity of a mitochondrial enzyme, by 20-40% after 24 h, with recovery at longer periods. Brief exposure to METH caused <10% cytotoxicity (measured by an assay that detects membrane damage). LPS from E. coli or the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. n.) significantly increased IL-1β production (measured by ELISA). Despite cytotoxicity of some METH concentrations, METH had no significant effect on constitutive IL-1β production. However, METH generally increased LPS-stimulated IL-1β levels, reaching statistical significance at 5 × 10-5 M METH (∼50% to >100% increase). The study suggests that METH potentiation of periodontopathogen LPS stimulation of IL-1β in monocytes could contribute to periodontitis in METH abusers, consistent with other studies suggesting a role for increased IL-1β in deleterious effects of METH.

AB - Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is associated with "METH mouth", characterized by rampant dental decay and destruction of periodontal bone and soft tissues. In periodontitis, monocyte/macrophages, stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), produce interleukin-1β (IL-1β), contributing to bone and soft tissue degradation. Effects of METH on monocyte/macrophages and its role in periodontitis are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine METH cytotoxicity and effects on constitutive and LPS-stimulated IL-1β production in THP-1 human monocytes. METH significantly reduced cell viability, assessed by activity of a mitochondrial enzyme, by 20-40% after 24 h, with recovery at longer periods. Brief exposure to METH caused <10% cytotoxicity (measured by an assay that detects membrane damage). LPS from E. coli or the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. n.) significantly increased IL-1β production (measured by ELISA). Despite cytotoxicity of some METH concentrations, METH had no significant effect on constitutive IL-1β production. However, METH generally increased LPS-stimulated IL-1β levels, reaching statistical significance at 5 × 10-5 M METH (∼50% to >100% increase). The study suggests that METH potentiation of periodontopathogen LPS stimulation of IL-1β in monocytes could contribute to periodontitis in METH abusers, consistent with other studies suggesting a role for increased IL-1β in deleterious effects of METH.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77649183952&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77649183952&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tiv.2009.11.015

DO - 10.1016/j.tiv.2009.11.015

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 921

EP - 927

JO - Toxicology in Vitro

JF - Toxicology in Vitro

SN - 0887-2333

IS - 3

ER -