Method for procuring specific populations of viable human prostate cells for research

Andrew H. Fischer, Abraham Philips, Panya Taysavang, Jesse K. McKenney, Mahul Amin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A wider range of research can be conducted on viable tissue samples than on fixed or frozen samples. A major obstacle to studying viable prostate tissue samples is the inability to accurately identify cancer on direct examination of unembedded tissue. We used a dissecting microscope to identify cancer in unfixed prostate tissue samples stained on the cut surface with 0.5% aqueous toluidine blue. We measured the diagnostic accuracy of this technique in 25 consecutive prostatectomies, determined the viability of procured samples, and estimated the effect on final pathologic assessment. Both surfaces of a 3- to 5-mm thick cross-section taken midway between base and apex of the prostate were examined. A 4-mm punch biopsy was directed to one benign and one malignant area when clearly present. The dissecting microscope allowed clearcut recognition of carcinoma in 17 of the 25 cross-sections, and carcinoma was confirmed in all 17 (100%). In 8 of 25 cases, no procurement was attempted because no carcinoma was evident in the one cross-section studied. Twenty of 25 cross-sections were adequate for benign tissue procurement; five of the cross-sections were not suitable for procurement because of the presence of extensive carcinoma or atrophy. Seventeen of the 20 were accurately diagnosed as benign (85%); one showed pseudohyperplastic adenocarcinoma, one showed focal high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and one showed urothelial carcinoma in situ. Prostatic epithelium obtained with the technique remains viable and can be separated from stroma. The dissecting microscope technique appears to facilitate rather than interfere with accurate pathologic assessment: extraprostatic extension or positive margins were correctly identified during tissue procurement in three cases. The procedure takes only about 30 minutes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Prostate
Carcinoma
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Research
Population
Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia
Tolonium Chloride
Carcinoma in Situ
Prostatectomy
Atrophy
Neoplasms
Adenocarcinoma
Epithelium
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Method for procuring specific populations of viable human prostate cells for research. / Fischer, Andrew H.; Philips, Abraham; Taysavang, Panya; McKenney, Jesse K.; Amin, Mahul.

In: Laboratory Investigation, Vol. 81, No. 4, 01.01.2001, p. 501-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fischer, Andrew H. ; Philips, Abraham ; Taysavang, Panya ; McKenney, Jesse K. ; Amin, Mahul. / Method for procuring specific populations of viable human prostate cells for research. In: Laboratory Investigation. 2001 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 501-507.
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