Methods and Models of the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson Disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Considerable progress has been made modeling the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease. These advances have helped us understand the molecular underpinnings of the disease as well as develop new treatments. However, a constellation of nonmotor symptoms precedes the onset of motor dysfunction in a large number of patients. These symptoms include anxiety and depression; sleep, olfactory, and gastrointestinal disturbances; and decline in executive functions. The modeling of these features lags behind development of models of motor symptoms, perhaps because they are more complex to assess compared to motor function. This chapter reviews the methods used to model nonmotor symptoms and current research in the area. Although animal models of Parkinson disease reliably recapitulate such features as hyposmia and gastrointestinal dysfunction, research in modeling affective symptoms or sleep disturbances requires more work. Inconsistencies in the methods to induce parkinsonism and perhaps species differences contribute to the difficulties in establishing robust models of these behaviors. In addition, although a number of mutant mouse models for Parkinson disease exist, relatively few of them have been used to study the nonmotor symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMovement Disorders
Subtitle of host publicationGenetics and Models: Second Edition
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages387-412
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9780124051959
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Parkinson Disease
Sleep
Affective Symptoms
Executive Function
Parkinsonian Disorders
Research
Anxiety
Animal Models
Depression
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mcdonald, M. (2015). Methods and Models of the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson Disease. In Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition (pp. 387-412). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-405195-9.00023-8

Methods and Models of the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson Disease. / Mcdonald, Michael.

Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2015. p. 387-412.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Mcdonald, M 2015, Methods and Models of the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson Disease. in Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., pp. 387-412. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-405195-9.00023-8
Mcdonald M. Methods and Models of the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson Disease. In Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc. 2015. p. 387-412 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-405195-9.00023-8
Mcdonald, Michael. / Methods and Models of the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson Disease. Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models: Second Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2015. pp. 387-412
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