Micro-Imaging of Amyloid in Mice

Jonathan Wall, Michael J. Paulus, Shaun Gleason, Jens Gregor, Alan Solomon, Stephen Kennel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scintigraphic imaging of radioiodinated serum amyloid P-component is a proven method for the clinical detection of peripheral amyloid deposits (Hawkins et al., 1990). However, the inability to perform comparably high-resolution studies in experimental animal models of amyloid disease has impacted not only basic studies into the pathogenesis of amyloidosis but also in the preclinical in vivo evaluation of potential anti-amyloid therapeutic agents. We have developed microimaging technologies, implemented novel computational methods, and established protocols to generate high-resolution images of amyloid deposits in mice. 125I-labeled serum amyloid P component (SAP) and an amyloid-fibril reactive murine monoclonal antibody (designated 11-1F4) have been used successfully to acquire high-resolution single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images that, when fused with x-ray computed tomographic (CT) data, have provided precise anatomical localization of secondary (AA) and primary (AL) amyloid deposits in mouse models of these diseases. This chapter will provide detailed protocols for the radioiodination and purification of amyloidophilic proteins and the generation of mouse models of AA and AL amyloidosis. A brief description of the available hardware and the parameters used to acquire high-resolution microSPECT and CT images is presented, and the tools used to perform image reconstruction and visualization that permit the analysis and presentation of image data are discussed. Finally, we provide established methods for measuring organ- and tissue-specific activities with which to corroborate the microSPECT and CT images.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-182
Number of pages22
JournalMethods in enzymology
Volume412
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 2006

Fingerprint

Amyloid Plaques
Serum Amyloid P-Component
Amyloid
Amyloidosis
Imaging techniques
Computer-Assisted Image Processing
Deposits
Photons
Animal Models
Monoclonal Antibodies
X-Rays
Technology
Image resolution
Computational methods
Image reconstruction
Purification
Animals
Proteins
Visualization
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Micro-Imaging of Amyloid in Mice. / Wall, Jonathan; Paulus, Michael J.; Gleason, Shaun; Gregor, Jens; Solomon, Alan; Kennel, Stephen.

In: Methods in enzymology, Vol. 412, 17.10.2006, p. 161-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wall, Jonathan ; Paulus, Michael J. ; Gleason, Shaun ; Gregor, Jens ; Solomon, Alan ; Kennel, Stephen. / Micro-Imaging of Amyloid in Mice. In: Methods in enzymology. 2006 ; Vol. 412. pp. 161-182.
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