Middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity

Technique and variability

Giancarlo Mari, Alfred Z. Abuhamad, Erich Cosmi, Maria Segata, Mekibib Altaye, Masashi Akiyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Assessment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) peak systolic velocity (PSV) can accurately diagnose fetal anemia and has decreased the number of invasive procedures, such as amniocentesis and cordocentesis. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the intraobserver and interobserver variability as a measure of reproducibility of MCA PSV. The technique of correctly sampling this vessel is described. Methods. The study population included 30 approphate-for-gestational-age fetuses. In each fetus, MCA PSV was determined proximal to the transducer at 3 different locations: 2 mm after its origin from the internal carotid artery, at the midlength between its origin and division, and at its division. The peak systolic velocity was also determined at the contralateral MCA 2 mm after its origin. With each measurement (obtained at 2 different institutions), care was taken to ensure that the ultrasound beam was parallel to the artery for its entire length. The reliability of an angle corrector was also assessed. The intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities were determined from the appropriate version of the intraclass correlation. Results. Gestational age at study entry ranged from 14 to 37.5 weeks (median, 23.6 weeks). The proximal MCA, 2 mm after its origin from the internal carotid artery, had the best intraobserver and interobserver variability in both institutions. (Intraclass correlation ranged from 0.98 to 0.99.) Conclusions. Our data indicate that fetal MCA PSV is optimally measured soon after the MCAs origin from the internal carotid artery. Given the importance of clinical decision making based on this measurement, sonographers and sonologists interested in measuring MCA PSV should test their variability after a suitable period of training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-430
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Middle Cerebral Artery
Internal Carotid Artery
Observer Variation
Gestational Age
Fetus
Cordocentesis
Amniocentesis
Transducers
Anemia
Arteries
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity : Technique and variability. / Mari, Giancarlo; Abuhamad, Alfred Z.; Cosmi, Erich; Segata, Maria; Altaye, Mekibib; Akiyama, Masashi.

In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.01.2005, p. 425-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mari, Giancarlo ; Abuhamad, Alfred Z. ; Cosmi, Erich ; Segata, Maria ; Altaye, Mekibib ; Akiyama, Masashi. / Middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity : Technique and variability. In: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 425-430.
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