Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

Emergence of a Pathogenic Human Coronavirus

Anthony R. Fehr, Rudragouda Channappanavar, Stanley Perlman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2012, a zoonotic coronavirus was identified as the causative agent of Middle East respiratory syndrome and was named MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). As of August 11, 2016, the virus has infected 1,791 patients, with a mortality rate of 35.6%. Although MERS-CoV generally causes subclinical or mild disease, infection can result in serious outcomes, including acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure in patients with comorbidities. The virus is endemic in camels in the Arabian Peninsula and Africa and thus poses a consistent threat of frequent reintroduction into human populations. Disease prevalence will increase substantially if the virus mutates to increase human-to-human transmissibility. No therapeutics or vaccines are approved for MERS; thus, development of novel therapies is needed. Further, since many MERS cases are acquired in healthcare settings, public health measures and scrupulous attention to infection control are required to prevent additional MERS outbreaks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-399
Number of pages13
JournalAnnual Review of Medicine
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 14 2017

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Coronavirus Infections
Coronavirus
Viruses
Camelus
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Zoonoses
Public health
Infection Control
Disease Outbreaks
Comorbidity
Vaccines
Public Health
Delivery of Health Care
Mortality
Therapeutics
Infection
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome : Emergence of a Pathogenic Human Coronavirus. / Fehr, Anthony R.; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Perlman, Stanley.

In: Annual Review of Medicine, Vol. 68, 14.01.2017, p. 387-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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