Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy without intraoperative localization

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Abstract

Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) is gaining popularity as an alternative to traditional bilateral exploration for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. The success of MIP relies on the ability of preoperative and intraoperative localization studies to guide a directed exploration for resection of a diseased gland. We hypothesize that excellent results can be achieved with MIP when only technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) is used for localization. We conducted a prospective analysis of all patients presenting with a biochemical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism between January 1997 and November 2000. Patients meeting inclusion criteria were given a choice of MIP and directed exploration versus traditional bilateral exploration. Fifty patients chose MIP. Three patients who chose MIP had a negative MIBI, which left 47 patients in the primary study group. The MIBI correctly identified a parathyroid adenoma in 42 patients (89.3%). In two other patients MIBI was inaccurate; however, directed exploration was successfully converted to a bilateral exploration. Overall 44 of 47 (93.6%) patients in the study group were rendered normocalcemic after the initial operation. Three patients experienced persistent hypercalcemia and subsequently underwent successful bilateral exploration. Including those patients choosing a bilateral exploration, a total of 59 positive MIBI scans were evaluated. There were 54 true positives (positive predictive value 91.5%), and if all patients had chosen a MIP 94.9 per cent would have been successfully treated at the initial operation. Mean operative time for MIP was 54.6 minutes, and in 32 patients (68.1%) MIP was performed with local anesthesia and sedation. Twenty-six patients (55.3%) were discharged the same day of the procedure. There were no significant complications in any group analyzed. We conclude that MIP can be successfully performed on the basis of a positive MIBI scan. The present study highlighting many of the advantages of MIP questions the necessity of additional adjuncts such as intraoperative parathyroid hormone measurement and γ-probe localization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1022-1029
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume67
Issue number11
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Parathyroidectomy
Primary Hyperparathyroidism
Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi
Parathyroid Neoplasms
Hypercalcemia
Local Anesthesia
Operative Time
Parathyroid Hormone

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy without intraoperative localization. / Sprouse, Larry Richard.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 67, No. 11, 01.12.2001, p. 1022-1029.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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