Minor trauma is an unrecognized contributor to poor fetal outcomes: A population-based study of 78,552 pregnancies

Peter Fischer, Ben L. Zarzaur, Timothy Fabian, Louis J. Magnotti, Martin Croce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Fetal outcomes after minor injury (MI) to pregnant women are difficult to study because these patients are discharged after emergency room evaluation and not entered in trauma registries. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of both minor and severe injury on fetal demise and prematurity/low birth weight (LBW) in a large population-based study using robust state databases. METHODS: The Tennessee State Fetal Birth and Death Data Systems were merged with the Tennessee State Hospital Discharge Data System using patient identifiers. All women with an e-code requiring inpatient admission during their pregnancy were considered severely injured, whereas those discharged after emergency room evaluation were considered to have MI. The impact of trauma on unintended fetal demise and premature birth/LBW was assessed using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: In 2005, there were 376 fetal deaths and 78,176 viable deliveries of which 11,817 were premature/LBW. Severe injury was significantly associated with fetal demise and prematurity/LBW. Unexpectedly, first- and second-trimester MI was associated with both fetal demise and prematurity/LBW. CONCLUSIONS: As expected, fetal mortality and morbidity increased after severe injury. Surprisingly, MI was associated with fetal demise, premature delivery, and LBW. Pregnant women who sustain MI should be told that they are at increased risk for an adverse outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-93
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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Fetal Death
Low Birth Weight Infant
Pregnancy
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Premature Birth
Information Systems
Hospital Emergency Service
Pregnant Women
Fetal Mortality
State Hospitals
Second Pregnancy Trimester
First Pregnancy Trimester
Registries
Inpatients
Logistic Models
Parturition
Databases
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Minor trauma is an unrecognized contributor to poor fetal outcomes : A population-based study of 78,552 pregnancies. / Fischer, Peter; Zarzaur, Ben L.; Fabian, Timothy; Magnotti, Louis J.; Croce, Martin.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 71, No. 1, 01.07.2011, p. 90-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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