Misclassification of nutrient and energy intake from use of closed-ended questions in epidemiologic research

Frances Tylavsky, Gerald B. Sharp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors investigated the effect of collecting food frequency intake data using questionnaires that record response intervals rather than exact frequencies of consumption. Measures of energy and 24 nutrients were calculated using both types of frequency data for subjects' mean intakes, rank classifications and group mean values. Frequency data obtained between 1987 and 1989 using the open-ended Health Habits and History Questionnaire (HHHQ) developed by Block and associates at the National Cancer Institute were recoded into the interval response formats used by the computer-scannable version of the HHHQ and into the format used in the food frequency questionnaire developed by Willett for the Nurses' Health Study and other studies. Compared with the open-ended HHHQ, for otherwise identical data sets, the closed-ended HHHQ and Willett response categories produced significantly different (p < 0.05) measures of intake on the individual level for 18 (72%) (HHHQ) and 16 (64%) (Willett) of the 25 nutrient and energy measures studied, and they ranked 13-53% (HHHQ) and 16-52% (Willett) of subjects in different quintiles for the various measures. Use of food frequency questionnaires with closed-ended response categories causes nondifferential misclassification that could bias study results. To reduce such misclassification in epidemiologic studies, the authors recommend that food frequency questionnaires obtain exact frequencies of intake for measurement of diet exposure, and they describe an open-ended questionnaire layout which does so and also permits computer scanning of data. Am J Epidemiol 1995;142:342-52.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-352
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume142
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1995

Fingerprint

Energy Intake
Food
Habits
Research
History
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Epidemiologic Studies
Eating
Nurses
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Misclassification of nutrient and energy intake from use of closed-ended questions in epidemiologic research. / Tylavsky, Frances; Sharp, Gerald B.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 142, No. 3, 01.08.1995, p. 342-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{765df46f45604c08be38e96d255d0293,
title = "Misclassification of nutrient and energy intake from use of closed-ended questions in epidemiologic research",
abstract = "The authors investigated the effect of collecting food frequency intake data using questionnaires that record response intervals rather than exact frequencies of consumption. Measures of energy and 24 nutrients were calculated using both types of frequency data for subjects' mean intakes, rank classifications and group mean values. Frequency data obtained between 1987 and 1989 using the open-ended Health Habits and History Questionnaire (HHHQ) developed by Block and associates at the National Cancer Institute were recoded into the interval response formats used by the computer-scannable version of the HHHQ and into the format used in the food frequency questionnaire developed by Willett for the Nurses' Health Study and other studies. Compared with the open-ended HHHQ, for otherwise identical data sets, the closed-ended HHHQ and Willett response categories produced significantly different (p < 0.05) measures of intake on the individual level for 18 (72{\%}) (HHHQ) and 16 (64{\%}) (Willett) of the 25 nutrient and energy measures studied, and they ranked 13-53{\%} (HHHQ) and 16-52{\%} (Willett) of subjects in different quintiles for the various measures. Use of food frequency questionnaires with closed-ended response categories causes nondifferential misclassification that could bias study results. To reduce such misclassification in epidemiologic studies, the authors recommend that food frequency questionnaires obtain exact frequencies of intake for measurement of diet exposure, and they describe an open-ended questionnaire layout which does so and also permits computer scanning of data. Am J Epidemiol 1995;142:342-52.",
author = "Frances Tylavsky and Sharp, {Gerald B.}",
year = "1995",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a117640",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "142",
pages = "342--352",
journal = "American Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0002-9262",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Misclassification of nutrient and energy intake from use of closed-ended questions in epidemiologic research

AU - Tylavsky, Frances

AU - Sharp, Gerald B.

PY - 1995/8/1

Y1 - 1995/8/1

N2 - The authors investigated the effect of collecting food frequency intake data using questionnaires that record response intervals rather than exact frequencies of consumption. Measures of energy and 24 nutrients were calculated using both types of frequency data for subjects' mean intakes, rank classifications and group mean values. Frequency data obtained between 1987 and 1989 using the open-ended Health Habits and History Questionnaire (HHHQ) developed by Block and associates at the National Cancer Institute were recoded into the interval response formats used by the computer-scannable version of the HHHQ and into the format used in the food frequency questionnaire developed by Willett for the Nurses' Health Study and other studies. Compared with the open-ended HHHQ, for otherwise identical data sets, the closed-ended HHHQ and Willett response categories produced significantly different (p < 0.05) measures of intake on the individual level for 18 (72%) (HHHQ) and 16 (64%) (Willett) of the 25 nutrient and energy measures studied, and they ranked 13-53% (HHHQ) and 16-52% (Willett) of subjects in different quintiles for the various measures. Use of food frequency questionnaires with closed-ended response categories causes nondifferential misclassification that could bias study results. To reduce such misclassification in epidemiologic studies, the authors recommend that food frequency questionnaires obtain exact frequencies of intake for measurement of diet exposure, and they describe an open-ended questionnaire layout which does so and also permits computer scanning of data. Am J Epidemiol 1995;142:342-52.

AB - The authors investigated the effect of collecting food frequency intake data using questionnaires that record response intervals rather than exact frequencies of consumption. Measures of energy and 24 nutrients were calculated using both types of frequency data for subjects' mean intakes, rank classifications and group mean values. Frequency data obtained between 1987 and 1989 using the open-ended Health Habits and History Questionnaire (HHHQ) developed by Block and associates at the National Cancer Institute were recoded into the interval response formats used by the computer-scannable version of the HHHQ and into the format used in the food frequency questionnaire developed by Willett for the Nurses' Health Study and other studies. Compared with the open-ended HHHQ, for otherwise identical data sets, the closed-ended HHHQ and Willett response categories produced significantly different (p < 0.05) measures of intake on the individual level for 18 (72%) (HHHQ) and 16 (64%) (Willett) of the 25 nutrient and energy measures studied, and they ranked 13-53% (HHHQ) and 16-52% (Willett) of subjects in different quintiles for the various measures. Use of food frequency questionnaires with closed-ended response categories causes nondifferential misclassification that could bias study results. To reduce such misclassification in epidemiologic studies, the authors recommend that food frequency questionnaires obtain exact frequencies of intake for measurement of diet exposure, and they describe an open-ended questionnaire layout which does so and also permits computer scanning of data. Am J Epidemiol 1995;142:342-52.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029152105&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029152105&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a117640

DO - 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a117640

M3 - Article

VL - 142

SP - 342

EP - 352

JO - American Journal of Epidemiology

JF - American Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0002-9262

IS - 3

ER -