Mks1p is required for negative regulation of retrograde gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae but does not affect nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive gene expression

Jennifer J. Tate, Kathleen H. Cox, Rajendra Rai, Terrance Cooper

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Abstract

The Tor1/2p signal transduction pathway regulates nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive (GAP1, GAT1, DAL5) and retrograde (CIT2, DLD3, IDH1/2) gene expression by controlling intracellular localization of the transcription activators, Gln3p and Gat1p, and Rtg1p and Rtg3p, respectively. The accepted pathway for this regulation is NH3 or excess nitrogen ⊣ Mks1p Ure2p ⊣ Gln3p → DAL5, and rapamycin or limiting nitrogen ⊣ Torp → Tap42 ⊣ Mks1p → Rtg1/3p → CIT2, respectively. In current models, Mks1p positively regulates both Gln3p (and DAL5 expression) and Rtg1/3p (and CIT2 expression). Here, in contrast, we show the following. (i) Mks1p is a strong negative regulator of CIT2 expression and does not effect NCR-sensitive expression of DAL5 or GAP1. (ii) Retrograde carbon and NCR-sensitive nitrogen metabolism are not linked by the quality of the nitrogen source, i.e. its ability to elicit NCR, but by the product of its catabolism, i.e. glutamate or ammonia. (iii) In some instances, we can dissociate rapamycin-induced CIT2 expression from Mks1p function, i.e. rapamycin does not suppress Mks1p-mediated down-regulation of CIT2 expression. These findings suggest that currently accepted models of Tor1/2p signal transduction pathway regulation require revision.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20477-20482
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume277
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2002

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Catabolite Repression
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene expression
Yeast
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Nitrogen
Gene Expression
Sirolimus
Signal transduction
Signal Transduction
Transcription
Ammonia
Metabolism
Glutamic Acid
Carbon
Down-Regulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Mks1p is required for negative regulation of retrograde gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae but does not affect nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive gene expression. / Tate, Jennifer J.; Cox, Kathleen H.; Rai, Rajendra; Cooper, Terrance.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 277, No. 23, 07.06.2002, p. 20477-20482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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