Modeling the mechanical behavior of the jaws and them related structures by finite element (FE) analysis

T. W.P. Korioth, Antheunis Versluis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we provide a review of mechanical finite element analyses applied to the maxillary and/or mandibular bone with their associated natural and restored structures. It includes a description of the principles and the relevant variables involved, and their critical application to published finite element models ranging from three-dimensional reconstructions of the jaws to detailed investigations on the behavior of natural and restored teeth, as well as basic materials science. The survey revealed that many outstanding FE approaches related to natural and restored dental structures had already been done 10-20 years ago. Several three-dimensional mandibular models are currently available, but a more realistic correlation with physiological chewing and biting tasks is needed. Many FE models lack experimentally derived material properties, sensitivity analyses, or validation attempts, and yield too much significance to their predictive, quantitative outcome. A combination of direct validation and most importantly, the complete assessment of methodical changes in all relevant variables involved in the modeled system probably indicates a good FE modeling approach. A numerical method for addressing mechanical problems is a powerful contemporary research tool. FE analyses can provide precise insight into the complex mechanical behavior of natural and restored craniofacial structures affected by three-dimensional stress fields which are still very difficult to assess otherwise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-104
Number of pages15
JournalCritical Reviews in Oral Biology and Medicine
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Finite Element Analysis
Jaw
Tooth
Mastication
Bone and Bones
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Modeling the mechanical behavior of the jaws and them related structures by finite element (FE) analysis. / Korioth, T. W.P.; Versluis, Antheunis.

In: Critical Reviews in Oral Biology and Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 90-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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