Molecular analysis of the CRINKLY4 gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana

Xueyuan Cao, Kejian Li, Sang Gon Suh, Tao Guo, Philip W. Becraft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The maize (Zea mays L.) CRINKLY4 (CR4) gene encodes a serine/threonine receptor-like kinase that controls an array of developmental processes in the plant and endosperm. The Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. genome encodes an ortholog of CR4, ACR4, and four CRINKLY4-RELATED (CRR) proteins: AtCRR1, AtCRR2, AtCRR3 and AtCRK1. The available genome sequence of rice (Oryza sativa L.) encodes a CR4 ortholog, OsCR4, and four CRR proteins: OsCRR1, OsCRR2, OsCRR3 and OsCRR4, not necessarily orthologous to the Arabidopsis CRRs. A phylogenetic study showed that AtCRR1 and AtCRR2 form a clade closest to the CR4 group while all the other CRRs form a separate cluster. The five Arabidopsis genes are differentially expressed in various tissues. A construct formed by fusion of the ACR4 promoter and the GUS reporter, ACR4::GUS, is expressed primarily in developing tissues of the shoot. The ACR4 cytoplasmic domain functions in vitro as a serine/threonine kinase, while the AtCRR1 and AtCRR2 kinases are not active. The ability of ACR4 to phosphorylate AtCRR2 suggests that they might function in the same signal transduction pathway. T-DNA insertions were obtained in ACR4, AtCRR1, AtCRR2, AtCRR3 and AtCRK1. Mutations in acr4 show a phenotype restricted to the integuments and seed coat, suggesting that Arabidopsis might contain a redundant function that is lacking in maize. The lack of obvious mutant phenotypes in the crr mutants indicates they are not required for the hypothetical redundant function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-657
Number of pages13
JournalPlanta
Volume220
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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Arabidopsis
phosphotransferases (kinases)
Arabidopsis thaliana
Zea mays
threonine
serine
Genes
phenotype
mutants
Phosphotransferases
genome
corn
genes
Genome
Phenotype
integument
Endosperm
endosperm
signal transduction
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

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Molecular analysis of the CRINKLY4 gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. / Cao, Xueyuan; Li, Kejian; Suh, Sang Gon; Guo, Tao; Becraft, Philip W.

In: Planta, Vol. 220, No. 5, 01.03.2005, p. 645-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cao, Xueyuan ; Li, Kejian ; Suh, Sang Gon ; Guo, Tao ; Becraft, Philip W. / Molecular analysis of the CRINKLY4 gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. In: Planta. 2005 ; Vol. 220, No. 5. pp. 645-657.
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