Molecular and cellular adaptation of muscle in response to physical training

F. W. Booth, B. S. Tseng, M. Flück, James Carson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Molecular biology tools can be used to answer questions as to how adaptations occur in skeletal muscle with training that could provide new frameworks to improve physical performance. A number of mRNAs for transfer of metabolic substrates into muscle cells increase after a single bout of exercise demonstrating the responsiveness of some gene expression to exercise. In stretch-induced hypertrophy SRE1 of the skeletal α-actin promoter is required to transactivate the promoter. Less retardation of SRF in crude nuclear extracts from the stretched muscle implies a conformational change in SRF because of the stretch. Transgenic animals will provide a tool to test questions concerned with how exercise signals adaptive changes in gene expression. Molecular biological approaches will be able to evaluate the interaction between physical activity levels and the expression of genes that modulate the susceptibility to many chronic diseases. Benefits of exercise extend beyond fitness to better health. Molecular biology is an important tool which should lead to improved physical performance and health in both elite athletes and the general public.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-350
Number of pages8
JournalActa Physiologica Scandinavica
Volume162
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 1998

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Exercise
Muscles
Gene Expression
Molecular Biology
Genetically Modified Animals
Health
Complex Mixtures
Athletes
Muscle Cells
Hypertrophy
Actins
Skeletal Muscle
Chronic Disease
Messenger RNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology

Cite this

Molecular and cellular adaptation of muscle in response to physical training. / Booth, F. W.; Tseng, B. S.; Flück, M.; Carson, James.

In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, Vol. 162, No. 3, 30.03.1998, p. 343-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Booth, F. W. ; Tseng, B. S. ; Flück, M. ; Carson, James. / Molecular and cellular adaptation of muscle in response to physical training. In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica. 1998 ; Vol. 162, No. 3. pp. 343-350.
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